Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

Sometimes, you can work on things for a long time, and it’s hard to measure progress. But there are other times when, suddenly, everything falls into place, and things happen very quickly!

The LBNF/DUNE team has had two main focus areas: gaining the approvals necessary to start early construction at the project’s far site at Sanford Lab in 2017 and prototyping the various systems that will eventually be scaled up and installed in DUNE’s massive underground neutrino detector.

Our planned flagship long-baseline neutrino experiment, LBNF/DUNE, is predicated on Fermilab being host to the international neutrino community in a manner similar to how CERN hosts the ATLAS and CMS experiments. This CERN model of international cooperation has been very successful. Learn about some of the ongoing efforts to internationalize Fermilab and our neutrino program through this column and video.

Deep in the dense core of a black hole, protons and electrons are squeezed together to form neutrons, sending ghostly particles called neutrinos streaming out. Matter falls inward. In the textbook case, matter rebounds and erupts, leaving a neutron star. But sometimes, the supernova fails, and there’s no explosion; instead, a black hole is born. Scientists hope to use neutrino experiments to watch a black hole form.