Big discoveries need big detectors, and Fermilab’s DUNE experiment is one of the biggest. In this 10-minute video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln gives the lowdown on this fascinating project. Fermilab plans to shoot beams of neutrinos and antineutrinos through Earth’s crust from Chicago to western South Dakota. DUNE will study neutrino interactions in great detail, with special attention on (a) comparing the behaviors of neutrinos versus antineutrinos, (b) looking for proton decay, and (c) searching for the neutrinos emitted by supernovae. The experiment is being built and should start operations in the mid to late 2020s.

This is a visual display of an ArgoNeuT event showing a long trail left behind by a high energy particle traveling through the liquid argon accompanied by small blips caused by low energy particles.

For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that low-energy neutrinos can be thoroughly identified with a liquid-argon particle detector. The results, obtained with the ArgoNeuT experiment, are promising for experiments that use liquid argon to catch neutrinos, including the upcoming Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment.

Fermilab has finalized an agreement with construction firm Kiewit-Alberici Joint Venture to start pre-excavation work for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, which will house the enormous particle detectors for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. The South Dakota portion of the facility will be built a mile beneath the surface at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.

Agencies in the United States and France have signed statements expressing interest to work together on the development and production of technical components for PIP-II, a major particle accelerator project with substantial international contributions. In addition, the French agencies also plan to collaborate on DUNE, an international flagship science project that will unlock the mysteries of neutrinos.

From Québec Science, Dec. 3, 2018: La mise en service d’immenses détecteurs au Fermilab, aux États-Unis, pourrait prochainement faire la lumière sur des particules aussi bizarres que prometteuses: les neutrinos.

From This Week in Science, Nov. 28, 2018: Fermilab scientist Alex Himmel talks about neutrinos, DUNE and the excitement of particle physics. Segment starts at 5:01.

From CERN Courier, Oct. 29, 2018: The world’s largest liquid-argon neutrino detector has recorded its first particle tracks in tests at CERN, marking an important step towards the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment under preparation in the United States.

From Black Hills Pioneer, Oct. 26, 2018: The new building will serve as housing for equipment that is currently located at the Ross complex, which will need to be moved in order to make room for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment/Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment construction planned in the coming years.