MINERvA

In today’s Wine and Cheese seminar, MINERvA will present a measurement of the probability that an electron neutrino interacts with a nucleus inside the MINERvA detector and produces an electron and no other particles besides protons and neutrons.

Para una versión en español, haga clic aquí. Para a versão em português, clique aqui. Pour une version en français, cliquez ici. Physics is a holistic science in which we consider not only the individual parts but also how these parts combine into groups. Nucleons, or protons and neutrons, combine in groups to form atomic nuclei. The differences between how free nucleons behave and how nucleons inside a nucleus (bound nucleons) behave are called nuclear effects. In the past, scientists… More »

Para una versión en español, haga clic aquí. Para a versão em português, clique aqui. Pour une version en français, cliquez ici. It can be hard to detect the ghostly neutrino, which rarely interacts with matter. To overcome this, neutrino experiments use detectors made of neutrons and protons bound up in heavy nuclei. The way these nuclei affect the particles made by neutrino interactions is not well understood, so MINERvA is working to measure this in as many ways as… More »

Para una versión en español, haga clic aquí. All particle physics experiments rely on computer simulations of their detectors to make measurements, but neutrino experiments struggle to test these simulations using particles that are created from the neutrino beam itself. Neutrino interactions often produce charged particles such as muons or electrons, and they knock one or more protons or neutrons out of the nucleus. Neutrino interactions also produce quark-antiquark pairs called pions (see earlier MINERvA results from February, August and… More »

Para una versión en español, haga clic aquí. Para a versão em português, clique aqui. Neutrinos are odd particles: They rarely interact in matter and can change character back and forth over time in a process called oscillation. When neutrinos do interact with matter, however, they do so in ways that are similar to how other high-energy particles produced by Fermilab accelerators interact: by making still more particles. So even though neutrinos themselves contain no quarks, they are still able… More »

The Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam facility, known as NuMI, was built at Fermilab so that scientists could have a tunable source of neutrinos with which to conduct experiments. The NuMI beam has been a fantastic success, leading to important measurements made by the MINOS, MINERvA and other experiments. The beam has now been “retuned” to optimize the sensitivity of the NOvA experiment, which expects to have first neutrino oscillation results in 2015. The NuMI beam is produced by… More »

The neutrino is known for how rarely it interacts with matter. But when it does, the interaction can take place numerous ways, and some interaction types happen more often than others. The ArgoNeuT experiment recently looked at one of the more rare cases — one that comes to only about 1 percent of all the possible ways a neutrino can interact. As one might expect, its infrequency poses a great challenge in our efforts to measure it. This month, the… More »

Para una versión en español, haga clic aquí. Para a versão em português, clique aqui. In February, the MINERvA experiment at Fermilab reported its findings of what happens when a neutrino produces a pion (a particle made of a quark and an antiquark) by interacting with a proton or neutron inside the nucleus. In today’s wine and cheese seminar, MINERvA will release its measurement of what happens when a neutrino or antineutrino produces a pion outside a nucleus by interacting… More »