MINERvA

José Luis Palomino Gallo, from Peru, earned his Ph.D. in physics at Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas last month, soon after presenting his research results at the recent NuInt12 workshop. He is the first student in the MINERvA Latin American collaboration to earn both his master’s and doctoral degrees on the MINERvA experiment. Photo: Flavia Schaller The group of Latin American collaborators on the MINERvA experiment attained a new milestone recently. José Luis Palomino Gallo, from Peru, has become the… More »

Neutrino scientists are currently trying to answer some exciting questions. How much do neutrinos weigh and why are they so light? How much do neutrinos change from one kind to another (called mixing) and why are their transformations so different from quark mixing? Do neutrinos mix differently from anti-neutrinos? To answer these questions, neutrino physicists must study how neutrinos and anti-neutrinos mix over time, which means using neutrino interactions to measure their energies and the distances they travel. If neutrinos… More »

Fermilab scientist Dave Schmitz (right) describes the MINERvA and MINOS experiments to Illinois State Senator Daniel Biss (left) on his tour at Fermilab on June 29. His visit also included stops at CDF and the Superconducting Radio Frequency Test Facility. Also pictured are (center left to right) Fermilab’s Elizabeth Clements and Jamie Santucci, as well as Gabriella Elkaim, an intern in Senator Biss’ office.

On Feb. 25, President Robert A. Wharton and Vice President for Research Affairs Ronald White from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology visited Fermilab. Their tour included a visit underground to the MINOS cavern. Standing in front of the MINERvA detector are (left to right) Elizabeth Clements, Ronald White, Mike Weis, Robert Wharton, Rob Plunkett, Jim Strait, Katie Yurkewicz and Gina Rameika.