A chip off the new board

vipram-14-0079-28D

This chip, called VIPRAM, is the first prototype of a new concept developed at Fermilab. It uses the emerging 3-D vertical integrated chip technology to advance state-of-the-art, fast pattern recognition within and outside high-energy physics. This prototype is in 2-D, but it contains all the building blocks that are fully compatible and ready for 3-D integration. One of its main potential applications is the real-time recognition of charged particles coming out of the CMS detector. The particles arise from billions of collisions every second at the future high-luminosity LHC. The R&D project is funded by the DOE Collider Detector R&D Program, and it is fully supported by URA fellowship program. Photo: Reidar Hahn

This is the Pulsar-II board, a general-purpose processor capable of creating a scalable architecture abundant in flexible, high-bandwidth interconnections. It has more than 1-terabit-per-second input-output capability. For high-luminosity LHC applications, the Pulsar-II can host a bank of high-performance VIPRAM chips, providing a powerful mechanism for the rapid recognition of charged particles in the CMS detector, crucial for frontier physics reach at high-luminosity LHC. Photo: Reidar Hahn

This is the Pulsar-II board, a general-purpose processor capable of creating a scalable architecture abundant in flexible, high-bandwidth interconnections. It has more than 1-terabit-per-second input-output capability. For high-luminosity LHC applications, the Pulsar-II can host a bank of high-performance VIPRAM chips, providing a powerful mechanism for the rapid recognition of charged particles in the CMS detector, crucial for frontier physics reach at high-luminosity LHC. Photo: Reidar Hahn