Congratulations to CMS and ATLAS on first results from second run

Fermilab and university scientists have played leading roles in some of the new results from CMS. First results from the Large Hadron Collider's second run were presented today. Photo: CERN

Fermilab and university scientists have played leading roles in some of the new results from CMS. First results from the Large Hadron Collider’s second run were presented today. Photo: CERN

Today at CERN, scientists from the CMS and ATLAS experiments presented their first results from analysis of the proton-proton collision data collected in 2015. Following the successful first run of the Large Hadron Collider, highlighted by the discovery of the Higgs boson, the energy of proton-proton collisions at the LHC was increased from 8 to 13 TeV after a two year shutdown. Run 2 began when the LHC resumed operations earlier this year, with the first 13-TeV collisions in June. Since then, the experiments have been working hard to first recommission their detectors after the shutdown and then collect data for physics analysis.

The results presented in the special seminar at CERN represent a first look at this year’s data sample.  The increased collision energy allows the experiments to already extend the reach of searches for new physics beyond the limits set during the first run of the LHC. Fermilab and university scientists, working together at the LHC Physics Center, have played leading roles in some of the new results from CMS, including searches for supersymmetry and new heavy particles. Details of all the new CMS results can be found on the CMS results Web page.

The data collected in 2015 is still only a small fraction of the full data sample expected in Run 2, which will last through 2018. Today’s results set the stage for more excitement in 2016 and beyond, as the LHC delivers more high-energy collisions and the experiments continue the search for new physics, following up on any hints in the data.