Patty McBride: Six things you should know

Patricia McBride

Patricia McBride

The Particle Physics Division gathered at the 327 Building on Nov. 2 for the first division all-hands meeting in more than a decade. The meeting was well-attended and packed with information, staff recognition and accolades. Here are six highlights from the meeting:

  1. PPD technical and scientific expertise continues to be highly sought after both at Fermilab and at other DOE laboratories. The May 2016 operations review indicated strong support or PPD technical facilities. Fermilab’s detector and test beam facilities continue to be a key asset to the lab and U.S. high-energy physics.
  1. This past year we saw many, many accomplishments — and many reviews! In fact, some PPD staff were involved in a review nearly every workday (we’re hoping for a lighter review schedule in the future).
  1. The Muon g-2 project will soon transition from construction to science operations. Reconstruction and shimming is happening right now, and vacuum chamber installation is under way. The Mu2e building will receive beneficial occupancy this month, and the first of 27 solenoid modules is expected to arrive early next year.
  1. The CMS forward pixel detector that was assembled at SiDet was delivered to CERN in early November. The SPT-3G was recently shipped to Antarctica after preassembly and testing at Lab A. Congratulations to both teams!
  1. The PPD administrative staff was recognized for their continued hard work and support, for both the division and labwide. The following administrative staff members received SPOT awards: Luz Jaquez, Carrie Farver, Patricia Guijarro, Barbara Hehner, Carolyn Johnson, Cindy Kennedy, Barbara Kristen, Constance Lang, Terry Read, Leticia Shaddix, Olivia Vizcarra, Noel Wiedman and Sonya Wright. Kimberly Veugeler also received a SPOT award from a co-worker.
  1. Safety oversight of the division is transitioning from Eric McHugh to Raymond Lewis, as evident in the passing of the light saber from one safety Jedi to another!

Patricia McBride is the head of the Particle Physics Division.