Four MicroBooNE researchers place in poster contests

Four early-career scientists on the Fermilab MicroBooNE experiment were recently recognized for their “excellence in poster presentation, the technical merit of the work presented, and the poster’s visual appeal and story-telling.” They placed in poster contests at the recent 2019 Meeting of the APS Division of Particles and Fields, the Fermilab 2019 Users Meeting and the 12th International Neutrino Summer School.

The MicroBooNE researchers’ work informs the scientific programs for other experiments that use liquid argon to detect neutrinos: the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, and Fermilab’s Short-Baseline Neutrino Program, which uses three detectors (one of which is the MicroBooNE detector).

When a neutrino strikes an argon nucleus, the resultant particles leave trails in the argon. The better scientists understand how neutrinos interact in argon, the better they know what patterns to look for in other liquid-argon-based experiments.

The winning posters below represent a few of MicroBooNE’s contributions in this critical area of neutrino research. Congratulations to the winners.

Vincent Basque

Vincent Basque
University of Manchester

First place, 12th International Neutrino Summer School

“Scintillation Light Triggering Efficiency in MicroBooNE”

Avinay Bhat

Avinay Bhat
Syracuse University

Third place, Fermilab 2019 Users Meeting poster contest

“MeV Scale Physics in MicroBooNE”

Katie Mason

Katie Mason
Tufts University

First place, 2019 APS Division of Particle and Fields meeting

“Using Convolutional Neural Networks to Reconstruct Dead Channels in MicroBooNE”

Kathryn Sutton

Kathryn Sutton
Columbia University

First place, Fermilab 2019 Users Meeting poster contest

“MicroBooNE’s Search for a Single Photon Low Energy Excess Under a Neutral Current Δ → Nγ Hypothesis”