Craig Hogan

Craig Hogan is a Fermilab scientist and a professor of astronomy and physics at the University of Chicago.

Rocky III

Craig Hogan Craig Hogan, director of the Center for Particle Astrophysics, wrote this week’s column. No, this column is not about a movie featuring an American comeback slugger. Instead, I’m providing an update on a science strategy report that came out this summer. “Rocky III” is the nickname for the latest in a series of reports on dark energy chaired by Edward “Rocky” Kolb of the University of Chicago. Rocky’s team was asked to comment on the status and opportunities…

Craig Hogan, director of the Center for Particle Astrophysics, wrote this column. Craig Hogan If you follow the news about physics, you might think that physicists don’t know what they are talking about when it comes to space. I am not talking about the mysteries of outer space, or cataclysms like black holes. I mean ordinary space itself, the inner space between particles everywhere—what we used to call empty space or vacuum. What’s in it? Sometimes we hear that atoms…

Craig Hogan Craig Hogan, director of the Center for Particle Astrophysics, wrote this week’s column. Scientists gathered at a Fermilab workshop last Friday to discuss the hunt for cosmic dark matter. They agreed that we may finally be closing in on a long-sought quarry. Fermilab theorist Dan Hooper succinctly expressed their sense of hopeful anticipation in the figure shown below. Technology is improving rapidly – faster than Moore’s law for computer speed – and theorists expect a discovery soon. The…

Craig Hogan Craig Hogan, director of the Center for Particle Astrophysics, wrote this week’s column. In time for the holidays, our friends in Chile received a big wooden box from Fermilab with a really nice, big, shiny digital camera: one of the largest cameras ever made, with more than half a billion cryogenically-cooled pixels and a beautiful wide-field lens a meter across. Parts of this giant Dark Energy Camera have been arriving in the Chilean Andes over the last year…

Craig Hogan Craig Hogan, Director of the Center for Particle Astrophysics, wrote this column. In the world according to quantum physics, particles move, interact and transform in space and time. Iconically, these processes are represented by Feynman diagrams, where interacting particle states appear as intersecting lines and squiggles. In a Feynman diagram, spacetime is represented by the paper or blackboard it is written on. Although it belongs to the same physical world as the particles, it is not part of…

Craig Hogan, head of the Center for Particle Astrophysics, wrote this week’s column. Craig Hogan The grandest spectacle in the universe is the structure defined by galaxies on the largest scales. Called the cosmic web, it is an enormous, perhaps even infinite structure, with a transcendent beauty. Dense clusters, each one swarming with thousands of orbiting galaxies, connect with each other over gossamer filaments and delicate sheets of galaxies, stretching across tens to hundreds of millions of light years. Between…

Craig Hogan Craig Hogan, head of the Center for Particle Astrophysics, wrote this week’s column. In 1990, a handful of Fermilab scientists joined a small consortium of universities to start the world’s first large-scale, precision digital survey of the universe, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. SDSS went on to wild success and became the most influential observatory of the past decade. Its results received more citations than the Hubble Space Telescope and played a key role in the transformation of…