Jessica Orwig

Rickey "Powerhouse" Winfield and Jack "Bonecrusher" Manprasert, CCD, hop on the treadmill at the recently refurbished Fermilab Fitness Center. The new mirror was installed in response to users’ requests. Many begin the new year with celebratory glasses of champagne, a stolen kiss from an admirer or loved one and perhaps a few final holiday cookies. In addition, the new year often means a few extra pounds around the waist line. Not to worry, however, because that’s what New Year’s resolutions…

Patients can receive high-energy neutron beam therapy for certain types of cancer at Fermilab’s Neutron Therapy Facility. The treatment involves positioning the patient in front of the beam port. A beam of neutrons is sent through the opening in the center, targeting the cancerous tissue. Photo: Jessica Orwig Amid the forest of wires and machines in Fermilab’s Linac Gallery is a small, windowless room accessible only through a sliding steel door. With wood-paneled walls and a couple of white, synthetic…

Fermilab AD employees recently completed the assembly of the electron gun in NML. Photo: Jerry Leibfritz, AD NML is a warehouse abuzz with humming electrical racks, hundreds of circuit boards and an enclosed laser room, which requires special training to enter. At the center of it all is the electron gun, which, if all goes well, will fire its first electron beam early next year. Providing electron beam is an essential part of the laboratory’s advanced accelerator R&D program, which…

Todd Nebel helps install insulation panels at MT6.2 at Fermilab’s Test Beam Facility. Photo: Reidar Hahn The largest enclosure of the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, called MT6.2, is getting a shiny, new look. What used to be a generic plastic- and cement-walled room now resembles something out of a science fiction film. Six thousand square feet of aluminum-coated insulation will soon adorn the walls and ceiling in MT6.2. The insulation will help to maintain the room’s temperature at 70 degrees…

A unusually dense patch of cardinal flowers was found thriving along a tree line on Fermilab grounds. Photo: Ryan Campbell, FESS Thanks to the efforts of one dedicated student, Fermilab has more than 4.5 million seeds of cardinal flower—the most ever collected at Fermilab. The red flower crops up in small, scattered patches around Fermilab, but this summer Roads and Grounds came across an unusually dense stretch hiding beneath some trees. The rare occasion was too much for student Michael…

“Calculations” is one of more than 20 works by Adam Fung hanging in the Fermilab Art Gallery until Jan. 20. One night when artist Adam Fung was hiking among the red terrain in Utah, he looked up and saw the night sky untainted by city lights. The bright band of the Milky Way galaxy, the colorful stars too many to count and all the darkness in between gave Fung a new inspiration for his work. Fung has spent most of…

Jennifer Raaf helps manage the construction of the MicroBooNE detector. Photo: Reidar Hahn How long have you been at Fermilab? I started in March of 2011. I was also part of Fermilab when I worked on MiniBooNE as a physics graduate student from roughly 2000 to 2005. Describe a typical workday. I work on the MicroBooNE experiment. I make sure that I and my group know what our plan is for the day and that we do it and do…

Veterans at yesterday’s Veterans Day celebration in Kuhn Barn salute the American flag. More than 100 people attended the event. Photo: Jessica Orwig The color guard hoists the American and U.S. Navy flags at yesterday’s Veterans Day celebration. Photo: Jessica Orwig Vietnam War veteran Tom Zilla spoke at yesterday’s Veterans Day celebration. Photo: Jessica Orwig

The glue dispensing machine runs the length of each NOvA detector module, coating it with slow-drying glue as it goes. Photo: William Miller, NOvA installation manager “Life in plastic. It’s fantastic!” sang the dance-pop band Aqua first in 1997 as tribute to Barbie and her perfect plastic world. The 5,000 tons of plastic that make up NOvA’s near and far detectors put any of Barbie’s plastic palaces to shame, both in size and strength. Sorry, Barbie. The far detector, the…

Fermilab scientist Cheng-Yang Tan stands to the left of the Fermilab’s new radio frequency quadrupole. Photo: Reidar Hahn In August, Fermilab said good-bye to its iconic Cockcroft-Walton generators. Now the new starting point for Fermilab’s chain of accelerators is in place. It’s called a radio-frequency quadrupole, or RFQ. Last month, workers moved the laboratory’s new, 3.5-meter-long RFQ to its permanent home between one of the Cockcroft-Walton generators and the front end of Fermilab’s linear particle accelerator, or Linac. Once in…