Joseph Piergrossi

Particle detectors are the eyes of physicists, peering closely into particle events to help us understand the basic laws of nature. To develop the kind of sight needed to view the complex particle events of future experiments, Fermilab researchers are transforming detection technology by developing new, intelligent detectors. They are pushing past the limits of two-dimensional chips, the current technology, by adding to them another dimension. The three-dimensional integrated chip, or 3DIC, will be key for future detectors. “3DIC technology…

An 8-inch-square microchannel plate, installed at Fermilab’s nickel-chromium coating facility, reflects the image of scientist Eileen Hahn, PPD. Hahn develops the "electroding" process for MCPs. Photo: Pasha Murat, PPD Since the mid-20th century, the standard photodetector in high-energy physics has been the photomultiplier tube. While PMTs tend to be accurate to within 100 picoseconds—that’s 100 trillionths of a second—a collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Chicago, Fermilab and several other institutions has created a photodetector that is even…

IMSA student Laura Napierkowski, who worked with Fermilab’s Brendan Casey and Mandy Rominsky, assembles straw detectors for the Muon g-2 project. Napierkowski eventually went on to present her work at the annual conference of the American Physical Society. Photo: Mandy Rominsky The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy has always had a close relationship with Fermilab. Former Fermilab Director Leon Lederman was its cofounder and inaugural resident scholar, helping shape the next generation of scientists. His legacy continues today as many…

Alluding to a quote from Winston Churchill, Fermilab scientist C.Y. Tan made this drawing of the new RFQ in April as a way to rally his Proton Source Department colleagues in the run-up to the device’s commissioning. On Wednesday morning, employees from across Fermilab assembled in the Linac Gallery to observe the decommissioning of the Cockcroft-Walton generators, which provided beam to the lab’s accelerators for 40 years. At the beginning of September, members of the Proton Source Department will begin…

After 40 years operation, Fermilab’s iconic Cockcroft-Walton generators will be decommissioned tomorrow morning. Photo: Reidar Hahn Fermilab has had many different accelerators in its four-decade history. From the Linac to the Tevatron to the Main Injector, every one of them has been powered by a Cockcroft-Walton generator. That ends tomorrow, when the generators send out their last beam. “They’ve been a critical part of our experiments,” said Proton Source Department Head Bill Pellico, who is overseeing their decommissioning. “People who…

This high-powered klystron emits a large radio-frequency signal that can be split into several signals and managed through vector modulators for several accelerator cavities at once. Photo: Joseph Piergrossi An accelerator test at Fermilab has shown that a proton beam could be accelerated with fewer radio-frequency power sources than previously used. A cavity is one of the elements in an accelerator that helps bring a particle beam up to the desired energy. As a particle beam travels down the axis…

Costas Vellidis On July 1, Costas Vellidis became the new CDF co-spokesperson, taking over for scientist Rob Roser. He joins current co-spokesperson Luciano Ristori in leading CDF’s transition from active experiment to data preservation center. Vellidis previously worked on CERN’s ATLAS experiment and has worked at CDF for the past five years. He led the top quark analysis group and was involved in the search for the Higgs boson and its associated Monte Carlo simulations. He said his experience with…

The winning teams from the July 23 Google Science Fair pose with the judging panel, including Fermilab Deputy Director Young-Kee Kim. Photo: Andrew Federman On July 23, Fermilab Deputy Director Young-Kee Kim joined 14 other scientists, science journalists and industry executives to judge the Google Science Fair in Palo Alto, California. Ninety individuals or teams from around the world, split into three age groups, qualified for the competition. For the July 23 event, judges chose 15 finalist projects by 21…

A stack of about 200 empty cable spools, referred to as Mount Ranson, sits in a parking lot near the Main Injector Ring. Mount Ranson is a reminder of a new technique that allows cable to be installed more quickly and more safely. Photo: Denton Morris, AD There’s a photo going around the Accelerator Division titled “Mount Ranson.” In the photo, several stacks of empty wooden spools stand in a parking lot, each stack roughly twice the height of a…