Rob Roser

Rob Roser Rob Roser, head of the Scientific Computing Division, wrote this column. The universe is a vast and mysterious place. Scientists around the world are starting to use computers to simulate how the big bang generated the seeds that led to the formation of galaxies such as our own Milky Way. A new project sponsored by three of the Energy Department’s national labs will allow scientists to study this vastness in greater detail with a new cosmological simulation analysis…

Rob Roser, head of the Scientific Computing Division, wrote this column. Rob Roser The computing landscape continues to change as technologies improve. As a graduate student, I ran my physics analysis jobs on a DEC VAX and thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread. As things evolved, I learned how to run jobs on farms of commodity PCs, which offered even more advantages. Now, experimenters use the Grid to run jobs on machines anywhere in the world. Technology…

Rob Roser Rob Roser, head of the Scientific Computing Division, wrote this column. We are constantly reminded what a precious commodity data is. Particle physicists have an insatiable thirst for it. It’s the currency in which discoveries are made. When we are looking for rare sightings, more data buys probability. And in our current era of highly-constrained budgets, we need to make the most out of the data that we have. Computing has always been important in particle physics, but…

On October 13, 1985 at Fermilab, the Tevatron produced protons and antiprotons collisions inside the CDF detector for the very first time. It was a magical day for the few dozen people in the accelerator and CDF control rooms. Since that day, literally billions of matter-antimatter collisions took place inside CDF and then inside CDF and DZero. What was once novel is now routine – and routine at an unprecedented scale. The intensity of the beams gradually multiplied, thanks to…

The di-jet invariant mass distribution for candidate events selected in an analysis of W+2 jet events. The black points represent the data. The red line plots the expected Standard Model background shape based on Monte Carlo modeling. The red shading shows the systematic and statistical uncertainty on this background shape. The blue histogram is the Gaussian fit to the unexpected peak centered at 144 GeV/c2 CDF Collaborator Viviana Cavaliere, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, presents the new CDF result in…

The figures show the number of top events as a function of delta rapidity. The blue shape is that of the background, the green is the Standard Model prediction for top, and the points are our data. The plot on the left contains events in which the ttbar mass is less than 450 GeV/c2 and is very symmetric. The plot on the right is for a ttbar mass of greater than 450 GeV/c2 and illustrates the discrepancy between expected and…