Troy Rummler

Mau Lopes has never waited as anxiously for a package as he did for the one that arrived late last month. From the Italian laboratory INFN-Genoa came the completed prototype of one coil module for the s-shaped Mu2e transport solenoid. The module is an aluminum ring about a meter wide and a meter deep, wound with hundreds of turns of superconducting cable. Twenty-seven modules joined together will generate the magnetic field that forms the experiment’s winding muon path. As a…

Lionel Prost of the Accelerator Division inspects the PXIE low-energy beam transport, which is now capable of delivering 10 milliamps of current. Photo: Reidar Hahn Fermilab has paved the first few feet of the long road to a dramatic upgrade of its injection complex. Specifically, it’s 8 feet, the current length of PXIE, a test accelerator that prototypes the front end of the proposed upgrades known as PIP-II. The project accomplished a significant step when researchers recently passed beam through…

Hero complex

Scientist Brendan Casey displays his role models on his cubicle wall. Photo: Troy Rummler, OC

Frank McConologue of the Technical Division designs components for Fermilab’s scientific projects. Photo: Reidar Hahn What do you do at Fermilab? Just about everything that’s physically made starts out as a drawing. We design things; we produce drawings. The drawings go to our machine shop or our welders or they go to an outside machine shop or an outside welding outfit. They get made, and we use them in the experiments. How long have you been here? Seventeen years. How…

Hasan Padamsee Hasan Padamsee, chief technology officer and head of the Technical Division, is now also the recipient of the American Physical Society’s Robert R. Wilson Prize. The 2015 award, which will be presented at the IPAC 2015 meeting in May, recognizes his outstanding achievement in the physics of particle accelerators. Specifically, the citation acknowledges his “leadership and pioneering world-renowned research in superconducting radio-frequency physics, materials science and technology, which contributed to remarkable advances in the capability of particle accelerators.”…

The plastic scintillator extrusion line, shown here, produces detector material for export to experiments around the world. Photo: Reidar Hahn Small, clear pellets of polystyrene can do a lot. They can help measure cosmic muons at the Pierre Auger Observatory, search for CP violation at KEK in Japan or observe neutrino oscillation at Fermilab. But in order to do any of these they have to go through Lab 5, located in the Fermilab Village, where the Scintillation Detector Development Group,…

The National GEM Consortium, a nationwide coalition of universities and employers, offers fellowships and internships to African American, Hispanic and Native American individuals to help them obtain advanced degrees and connect to careers in science and engineering. For 35 years Fermilab has been allied with GEM as one of the lab’s chief pipelines to build a diverse workforce. The longstanding relationship ensures that Fermilab can solve new problems in physics and engineering with a dynamic arsenal of perspectives. In return,…

Aaron Sauers is the newest member of the Fermilab Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer. Photo: Reidar Hahn What’s your role at the lab? I work in the Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer, which is specifically charged with deploying technologies that are developed at Fermilab. How did you end up here? I’ve worked at several national laboratories: Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Idaho and Argonne right before coming here. When I was getting my M.B.A. at the University of Tennessee,…

The 64-by-64 pixel VIPIC prototype, pictured with a sensor on the bottom and solder bump-bonding bump on top, ready to be received on the printed circuit board. Photo: Reidar Hahn A collaboration blending research in DOE’s offices of High-Energy Physics (HEP) with Basic Energy Sciences (BES) will yield a one-of-a-kind X-ray detector. The device boasts Brookhaven Lab sensors mounted on Fermilab integrated circuits linked to Argonne Lab data acquisition systems. It will be used at Brookhaven’s National Synchrotron Light Source…

A team from the Accelerator Division has successfully powered this small SRF cavity with a magnetron. Now they aim to power a large, application-specific model. Photo: Brian Chase, AD If you own a magnetron, you probably use it to cook frozen burritos. The device powers microwave ovens by converting electricity into electromagnetic radiation. But Fermilab engineers believe they’ve found an even better use. They’ve developed a new technique to use a magnetron to power a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity, potentially…