Video

In this lecture, part III of the virtual lecture series, “How to do big science,” Deborah Harris talks about the construction of the MINERvA neutrino experiment at Fermilab. The MINERvA collaboration used a high-intensity neutrino beam to collect data on neutrino interactions with a wide variety of materials. Harris served as the project manager of detector construction, and in 2010, she was elected to be the scientific co-spokesperson of MINERvA.

Fermilab’s CDF experiment has recently announced a measurement of the mass of the W boson with unprecedented precision. Even more interesting, the measurement disagrees with theoretical predictions. If confirmed, this could be a very big deal. In this video, Fermilab’s Don Lincoln gives a far-ranging explanation of the measurement and its significance.

Neutrinos are neutral, meaning the magnets in a particle accelerator can’t manipulate them. So how can scientists make a dense beam of neutrinos for their experiments? Neutrino physicist Kirsty Duffy and Fermilab accelerator operator Laura Bolt explain the power of protons and how teams can generate intense beams of neutrinos using particle accelerators.

Physics students often ask how it is that a massless photon can have momentum. In this video, Don Lincoln shows that the question arises from a misuse of equations and also shows that, when you think about it, it’s not surprising at all.

Watch highlights of the popular cryogenics show for kids and adults with Fermilab’s Mr. Freeze: cool demonstrations with liquid nitrogen to explore the properties and effects of extreme cold.

Using neutrino experiments at Fermilab as an example, Jorge Morfin explains the path of a large physics experiment from inspiration through the proposal process to approval. The lecture is part II of the virtual lecture series, “How to do big science,” hosted by the Fermilab Arts & Lectures At Home Series.

Why is the sky blue?

“Why is the sky blue?” is a natural question, asked by many people, children and adults alike. In this video, Don Lincoln answers the question and even reveals the surprising fact that it should really be purple.

Neutrinos are powerful tools for better understanding how the universe works and improving our theories, like the famed Standard Model. But what else are neutrinos good for? Neutrino physicist Kirsty Duffy explains some of the (mostly not-so-practical) ways we might use neutrinos.

In this lecture, Marcela Carena, head of the Theory Division at Fermilab and professor of physics at the University of Chicago, talks about “The unseen universe: Challenges for theory and experiment.” She explains how theorists think about the Higgs boson, neutrinos, dark matter and the exciting results from the Fermilab Muon g-2 experiment announced last year, and how these ideas can lead to new experiments and discoveries.