magnet

This is one of the several conning towers that served as the feed-through for a corrector magnet in the Tevatron. The red silicone protected the electrical connections from corrosion, which could lead to electrical shorts. An ice ball was usually present around the whole tower when the magnet was in use.

Dipole magnets produce the dominant magnetic field that bends the particles traveling through the Main Ring. This particular dipole magnet sits skewed and bends both vertically and horizontally — deliberately so! — just ahead of the DZero collision hall.

From Silicon Republic, April 8, 2016: Researchers in the United States, including Fermilab researchers, and CERN have teamed up to produce 20 new accelerator magnets, which, when put together into the next LHC in 2026, will up its power by a factor of ten.

This photo was taken in the Fermilab Tevatron tunnel. The light blue structures are old Main Ring magnets, and the red structures are Tevatron magnets. The “painted” light remind us of magnetic field lines. This 30-second exposure was taken by setting the camera on a tripod and swinging lights around.

Last month, a group collaborating across four national laboratories completed the first successful tests of a superconducting coil in preparation for the future high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider, or HL-LHC. These tests indicate that the magnet design may be adequate for its intended use. Physicists, engineers and technicians of the U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) are working to produce the powerful magnets that will become part of the HL-LHC, scheduled to start up around 2025. The plan…