magnet

This model of the Mu2e solenoids was made on a 3-D printer at the University of Virginia. The Mu2e solenoids will form a continuous magnetic channel that captures pions from a production target, form a secondary muon beam and provide a constant field for momentum analysis of 100-MeV electrons. The magnetic field varies from nearly 5 Tesla (at the far right) to 1 Tesla (at the far left). The Mu2e tracker and calorimeter reside inside the solenoid at the far left. 3-D printing technology makes it possible to fabricate detailed models for a fraction of the cost of a traditional scale model.

Scientists of the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of Science’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and collaborators of the US/CMS project have joined colleagues from around the world in announcing that the world’s largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field strength in tests at CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory.

Officials of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, near Chicago, and of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, in Geneva, announced today (Tuesday) the shipment of an advanced superconducting magnet from Fermilab to CERN.