quark

On July 4, 2012, researchers at the CERN laboratory in Europe announced the discovery of the Higgs boson. It was a tremendous triumph for the Standard Model of particle physics and confirmed a prediction made nearly half a century prior. In 2022, we celebrate the 10th anniversary of that momentous discovery.

From NewScientist, March 8, 2021: The recent experiment results of asymmetry in protons published in Nature calling out the new research used to improve measurement techniques from Fermilab’s SeaQuest detector.

From Reccom Magazine, Feb. 26, 2021: Chuck Brown of the Fermilab SeaQuest research team is quoted in this piece on the sea of quarks inside the proton. The article discusses Fermilab’s contributions to the SeaQuest and NuSea experiments.

Protons are built from three quarks — two “up” quarks and one “down” quark. But they also contain a roiling sea of transient quarks and antiquarks that fluctuate into existence before swiftly annihilating one another. At the Fermilab-hosted SeaQuest experiment, researchers report that that lopsidedness persists in a realm of previously unexplored quark momenta.

From Forbes, Feb. 17, 2021: Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln contextualizes the accomplishment of researchers working at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, or J-PARC. They have made an atomic nucleus that contains an unstable particle called the hyperon, or cascade particle. This could help in understanding neutron stars.

Matter and antimatter particles can behave differently, but where these differences show up is still a puzzle. Scientists on the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider study much more subtle differences between matter particles and their antimatter equivalents. A recent analysis allowed them to revisit an old mystery — an asymmetry between asymmetries.