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From Forbes, Feb. 17, 2021: Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln contextualizes the accomplishment of researchers working at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, or J-PARC. They have made an atomic nucleus that contains an unstable particle called the hyperon, or cascade particle. This could help in understanding neutron stars.

Matter and antimatter particles can behave differently, but where these differences show up is still a puzzle. Scientists on the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider study much more subtle differences between matter particles and their antimatter equivalents. A recent analysis allowed them to revisit an old mystery — an asymmetry between asymmetries.

The field of particle physics searches to find the explanation for the universe, focusing on the fundamental building blocks and most basic force that governs them. Our current best theory of the subatomic world is the Standard Model, which invokes quarks and leptons to build the cosmos. In this 13-minute episode of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explores the idea that quarks and leptons might not be the final story.

Hadrons count among their number the familiar protons and neutrons that make up our atoms, but they are much more than that.

Quarks are fundamental subatomic particles found in the center of atoms. They interact strongly with one another and are the building blocks of protons and neutrons. Two of them were discovered at Fermilab. In episode 2 of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln tells us about these fascinating particles.

With this six-minute video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln launches a special series called Subatomic Stories. You will learn a little bit about both the exciting subatomic world and the entire cosmos — and see how the two are inextricably linked. Each episode will focus on a specific topic, but the series will tell a much broader story.

A re-examination of a particle discovered in 2015 has scientists debating its true identity. A recent analysis by the LHCb collaboration at CERN raises questions about the identity of this pentaquark—and may have taken scientists back to square one in the search for a particle that could shed light on questions about color.