Author Archive

Nikita Kuklev (peeking into the frame), graduate student at the University of Chicago, and Alexander Valishev, scientist at Fermilab and head of the Accelerator Science and Technology Sector in the Accelerator Division, collect the last data sets before the end of Run 2 at the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator, known as IOTA, in March (while keeping their distance). During this research period, several experiments were carried out, including studies of new magnet configurations to stabilize high-intensity beams for future particle physics experiments. people Photo: Giulio Stancari

Nikita Kuklev, graduate student at the University of Chicago, and Alexander Valishev, scientist at Fermilab and head of the Accelerator Science and Technology Sector in the Accelerator Division, collect the last data sets before the end of Run 2 at the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator, known as IOTA, in March (while keeping their distance from each other). During this research period, several experiments were carried out, including studies of new magnet configurations to stabilize high-intensity beams for future particle physics experiments.

Evan Angelico, graduate student at the University of Chicago, sets up the time-of-flight experiment (T-1553) at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. The experiment studies techniques to identify high-energy particles based on their velocity by measuring their positions and arrival times with novel large-area picosecond photodetectors, known as LAPPDs.

Dark Matters

This work, "Dark Matters," is a concept/sculpture by Jim Jenkins, 2017 Fermilab artist-in-residence. The center of the sculpture is a lead-glass block from the electromagnetic calorimeter of Fermilab experiment E-760/E-835 (charmonium spectroscopy). This picture was taken after a performance of "Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps" by Olivier Messiaen in Ramsey Auditorium. The sculpture was positioned behind the performers on the auditorium stage. Photo: Giulio Stancari

This work, “Dark Matters,” is a concept/sculpture by Jim Jenkins, 2017 Fermilab artist-in-residence. The center of the sculpture is a lead-glass block from the electromagnetic calorimeter of Fermilab experiment E-760/E-835 (charmonium spectroscopy). This picture was taken after a performance of “Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps” by Olivier Messiaen in Ramsey Auditorium. The sculpture was positioned behind the performers on the auditorium stage.

A photographer appreciates a fellow artist’s work: This photographic detail of “Phage,” a Lichtenberg figure sculpture by Todd Johnson, was taken by Giulio Stancari. These Lichtenberg sculptures by Johnson are also known as shockfossils. You can see Johnson’s and other Fermilab staff’s artwork in the Fermilab Art Gallery.

June moon

A beautiful June moonrise over the Lederman Science Center and Wilson Hall is captured near the Pine Street gate.