Newsroom

Dark Energy Survey releases most precise look at the universe’s evolution

The Dark Energy Survey collaboration has created the largest ever maps of the distribution and shapes of galaxies, tracing both ordinary and dark matter in the universe out to a distance of over 7 billion light years. The analysis, which includes the first three years of data from the survey, is consistent with predictions from the current best model of the universe, the standard cosmological model. Nevertheless, there remain hints from DES and other experiments that matter in the current universe is a few percent less clumpy than predicted.

Fermilab is America’s particle physics and accelerator laboratory. Our vision is to solve the mysteries of matter, energy, space and time for the benefit of all.

2 Fermilab scientists receive DOE Early Career Research Awards

The DOE’s Office of Science has selected two Fermilab scientists to receive the 2021 DOE Early Career Research Award, now in its 12th year. Farah Fahim and Brian Nord have received the prestigious award, which is designed to bolster the nation’s scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early years.

ICARUS gets ready to fly

The ICARUS detector, part of Fermilab’s Short-Baseline Neutrino Program, will officially start its hunt for elusive sterile neutrinos this fall. The international collaboration led by Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia successfully brought the detector online and is now collecting test data and making final improvements.

See more news »

Fermilab in the news

From the California News Times, June 9, 2021: There is a new robotics project at Fermilab called Argonaut and its mission is to sail into a sea of liquid argon kept at minus 193 degrees Celsius to monitor the condition inside the ultra-low temperature particle detector.

From the Dallas Morning News, June 13, 2021: The results of the April 7 Muon g-2 result strongly disagreed with the standard model and it is incumbent upon us now to explain this observation, writes Stephen Sekula, chair of physics and an associate professor of experimental particle physics at Southern Methodist University.

Featured videos