Don Lincoln

Don Lincoln is a Fermilab scientist.

This March, scientists from around the world gathered in LaThuile, Italy, for the 53rd annual Recontres de Moriond conference, one of the longest running and most prestigious conferences in particle physics. This conference is broken into two distinct weeks, with the first week usually covering electroweak physics and the second covering processes involving quantum chromodynamics. Fermilab and the LHC Physics Center were well represented at the conference.

The success of a scientific experiment can be measured in a few ways, but perhaps the best one is number of scientific publications. Even there, there are different ways of counting them, but a good method is the number of publications submitted per year. And in 2018, CMS had a banner year in terms of scientific output. The CMS collaboration broke a record, with 141 scientific papers submitted to peer reviewed journals. That’s nearly three each week. The previous record in high-energy physics was also held by CMS. In 2017, the CMS experiment submitted 132 papers.

Eight is enough

CMS goes looking for particle physics events that produce eight particles produced by new physics.

How is examining a particle decay pattern like unfolding a piece of origami? A recent CMS finding reminds us that examining particle decays can be as much about what you don’t see — the folds and creases — as the result.

QCD is holding its own. Even at energies 63 percent higher compared to the LHC’s first run, the data produced during the current, second run bears out the decades-old predictions of QCD.

The particles resulting from collisions of lead nuclei with protons at the LHC allow scientists to explore possible novel nuclear matter.

In their search for dark matter, CMS scientists invented new measurement variables, called razor variables, to enhance their capability to identify events containing dark matter.

Busy bees

CMS scientists look for four b‘s — bottom quarks that might point the way to Higgs boson pairs.