LBNF/DUNE/PIP-II/SBN articles – Mar. 2019 to Sep. 2019

LBNF/DUNE/PIP-II/SBN media articles

From Eifel Zeitung, Sept. 5, 2019: Das nächste große Neutrinoexperiment DUNE am Fermilab in Chicago wollen sie maßgeblich mitgestalten und sind dabei nun einen wichtigen Schritt vorangekommen: Verantwortliche von Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz und Fermilab haben eine Vereinbarung zur gemeinsamen Berufung einer international renommierten Forscherpersönlichkeit unterzeichnet.

From Science, Aug. 8, 2019: Fermilab physicists are resurrecting a massive particle detector by lowering it into a tomblike pit and embalming it with a chilly fluid. In August, workers eased two gleaming silver tanks bigger than shipping containers, the two halves of the detector, into a concrete-lined hole. Hauled from Europe two years ago, ICARUS will soon start a second life seeking perhaps the strangest particles physicists have dreamed up, oddballs called sterile neutrinos.

From SDPB Radio’s “In the Moment: Innovation,” July 26, 2019: In this 18-minute radio piece, Fermilab Director Nigel Lockyer discusses experimental particle physics, the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and the partnership with the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota.

From the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, July 9, 2019: The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will start running in 2026, studying an intense beam of neutrinos that starts at Fermilab and that will be measured in underground caverns in Lead, South Dakota. Fermilab scientists Deborah Harris and Sam Zeller talk about the mysteries of neutrinos and how DUNE will address them in this in depth article.

From Kelo, July 19, 2019: Fermilab’s Patrick Weber and others talk about the international, Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and its Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility in this 8-minute video. Sanford Underground Research Facility is home to the DUNE far detector, and the world-leading research taking place at there is giving scientists from a variety of disciplines a wealth of information about the universe, the geology of the region and life underground.

From Kelo, July 10, 2019: Fermilab’s Bonnie Fleming talks about neutrinos, the international, Fermilab-hosted DUNE and and LBNF in this 9-minute video on the research taking place one mile underground in Lead, South Dakota, at the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

From Rapid City Journal, July 12, 2019: Fermilab Director Nigel Lockyer was the guest for a free public speaker series held one day prior to Neutrino Day, a full day of neutrino-themed public activities in Lead. Lockyer spoke about is known as the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), housed in the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), which will have its South Dakota component at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in the former Homestake mine. It’s a billion-dollar international collaboration, and it’s described as the largest particle physics project ever built in the United States.

From KOTA TV, May 20, 2019: Fermilab’s Patrick Weber and Sanford Lab’s Mike Headley talk with the South Dakota news program about the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility in this 3-minute segment.

From Labmate, May 4, 2019: Researchers at the UK’s Scientific Technology Facilities Council are collaborating with Malaysian academics on projects that will both develop scientific capabilities and the research potential of Malaysian science in helping to discover new answers to some major scientific challenges. The projects include the Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment.

From DOE’s Direct Current podcast, May 7, 2019: This episode of Direct Current takes a subatomic sojourn into the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, a massive international research project aiming to unlock the secrets of the neutrino with help from more than 175 institutions in over 30 countries. Join Fermilab’s Chris Mossey, Bonnie Fleming and Lia Merminga and DUNE collaborator Christos Touramanis on a tour from Fermilab to CERN to the bottom of a former gold mine a mile beneath the hills of South Dakota.

From WDCB’s First Light, March 24, 2019: Brian O’Keefe interviews Fermilab PIP-II Project Director Lia Merminga about PIP-II, an accelerator project critical to the lab’s future. Fermilab broke ground on PIP-II on March 15. Learn about how PIP-II will power the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, and the lab’s experimental program in this 15-minute piece.

From Gizmodo, March 20, 2019: The Proton Improvement Plan II, formally approved by the Department of Energy last summer, includes plans for the highest-energy linear particle accelerator to accelerate a continuous stream of protons — a central component to the American particle physics laboratory. Fermilab PIP-II Project Director Lia Merminga is quoted in this article.

From Space Daily, March 19, 2019: A major new physics facility at Fermilab is expected to have UK technology at its heart and lead to significant spin-off opportunities for UK companies.
The new PIP-II particle accelerator will power the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, which aims to address key questions about the origins and structure of the universe. The UK has committed a 65 million-pound investment to help build and operate DUNE, PIP-II and technology for the neutrino beam.

From MeteoWeb, March 18, 2019: Si è tenuta il 15 marzo al Fermilab, negli Stati Uniti, la cerimonia di posa della prima pietra di uno dei più importanti progetti per il futuro della fisica, in cui l’Italia porta un contributo tecnologico e scientifico di primo piano. Si tratta del progetto PIP-II per la realizzazione di un nuovo acceleratore lineare superconduttore, lungo 215 metri: una delle macchine più avanzate per la ricerca in fisica fondamentale che avrà il compito di produrre il fascio di neutrini di alta energia più potente del mondo per il progetto DUNE.

From Kane Country Chronicle, March 15, 2019: Fermilab broke ground on a major new particle accelerator project on March 15 that will power cutting-edge physics experiments for many years to come. The new 700-foot-long linear accelerator, part of the laboratory’s Proton Improvement Plan II, will be the first such project built in the United States with significant contributions from international partners.

From Daily Herald, March 15, 2019: The ongoing attempt to fully understand our universe — how it started, what it’s made of, why it sticks together — is getting a new tool: a powerful linear particle accelerator at Fermilab.
Officials on Friday broke ground for the Proton Improvement Project-II, which officials said will power cutting-edge physics experiments for decades.

From NPR’s Here & Now, March 19, 2019: Fermilab is a global center for research into a tiny particle that could help answer some of the biggest questions in physics: the neutrino. Neutrinos have no electrical charge and almost no mass, but they’re everywhere. Fermilab Director Nigel Lockyer and Fermilab Deputy Chief Research Officer Bonnie Fleming talk about the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, visit the NOvA experiment and discuss the benefits of fundamental research.

From ABC7, March 15, 2019: Fermilab broke ground on a new particle accelerator project Friday.
The new machine will power cutting-edge physics experiments for years to come by allowing scientists to study invisible particles called neutrinos, which may hold the key to cosmic mysteries.

LBNF/DUNE/PIP-II/SBN Fermilab-produced articles

The Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany, has taken a significant step to participate in the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab. Fermilab and the university have signed an agreement to jointly appoint an internationally renowned researcher who will strengthen the experimental particle physics research program at JGU Mainz and advance a German contribution to DUNE. This is the first Fermilab joint agreement with a university in Germany.

The first major superconducting section of the PIP-II accelerator has come to Fermilab: the first of 23 cryomodules for the future accelerator. The cryomodules’ job is to get the lab’s powerful proton beam up and moving, sending it to higher and higher energies, approaching the speed of light. This first cryomodule also represents a successful joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory and Fermilab to design and produce a critical accelerator component for the future heart of Fermilab.

Scientists are working on a pixelated detector capable of clearly and quickly capturing neutrino interactions — a crucial component for the near detector of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Using technological solutions developed at University of Bern and Berkeley Lab, a prototype detector called ArgonCube is under construction in Bern and will arrive at Fermilab next year.

The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility team is in the process of rehabilitating an old mining tunnel in South Dakota for the installation of a conveyor system to transport rock. In June, they reached a milestone when they finished the rebuilding of the portal to the tunnel.

“Why there is something, rather than nothing?” is a timeless question in both science and philosophy. In this video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explains the theory of leptogenesis, which might be the answer. The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will test this idea.

The Universities Research Association recognizes Fermilab scientist Laura Fields for her contributions to the field of accelerator-based neutrino physics. She co-leads the MINERvA experiment, which is making measurements necessary for tuning models of neutrino interactions used in ongoing and future neutrino experiments, and helped design a new focusing system for Fermilab’s LBNF neutrino beam.

The elusive neutrino is the most difficult to detect of the particles of the Standard Model. The story is more complex than that. When a neutrino actually interacts, it is easy to detect. At the same time, they interact only rarely. In this 10-minute video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln discusses the trials and tribulations of neutrino hunters.

Excavating about 800,000 tons of rock a mile underground, bringing it to the surface, and then transporting it to its final resting place is a huge job and part of the LBNF/DUNE project. Creating the infrastructure for that job is a huge amount of work by itself and is going on right now.

Particle detectors recorded neutrinos from supernova SN1987A hours before telescopes saw the first light. Thirty years later, scientists around the world are eager to detect neutrinos from another one. The international Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will be looking for them. These neutrinos can tell us more about supernovae themselves and may hint at new physics that could upend the Standard Model of particle physics.

Hear what Fermilab’s honored guests had to say about the importance of science, international collaboration and Fermilab’s role in advancing discovery and cutting-edge technology at the March 15 groundbreaking for the PIP-II accelerator project. The ceremony was attended by U.S. dignitaries and international partners.

On March 15, Fermilab broke ground on PIP-II, a major new particle accelerator project at Fermilab. Dignitaries from the United States and international partners celebrated the start of the project at the groundbreaking ceremony. The PIP-II accelerator will power the long-term future of the laboratory’s research program, including the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and a suite of on-site experiments.

LBNF/DUNE/PIP-II/SBN articles produced by U.S. and international partners

From CNRS, Aug. 30, 2019: A scientist at the French National Center for Scientific Research talks about neutrinos and the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, in this 2-minute video.

From Agência FAPESP, May 1, 2019: Na última década foi iniciada, em diferentes países da América Latina, a operação de grandes infraestruturas de pesquisa, como o maior observatório de raios cósmicos do mundo, o Pierre Auger, na Argentina, e o Observatório Cherenkov de Água de Alta Altitude, no México. Nos próximos anos, devem ser concluídas as obras do Sirius – a nova fonte brasileira de luz síncrotron – e do Laboratório Argentino de Feixes de Nêutrons.

From University of Chicago news, March 15, 2019: Fermilab officially broke ground March 15 on a major new particle accelerator project that will power cutting-edge physics experiments for many decades to come. The new 700-foot-long linear accelerator, part of the laboratory’s Proton Improvement Plan II, will be the first accelerator project built in the United States with significant contributions from international partners.

From UK Research & Innovation news, March 15, 2019: A major new physics facility at Fermilab is expected to have UK technology at its heart and lead to significant spin-off opportunities for UK companies.
The new PIP-II particle accelerator will power the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, which aims to address key questions about the origins and structure of the universe. The UK has committed £65 million investment to help build and operate DUNE, PIP-II and technology for the neutrino beam.

From INFN, March 15, 2019: Si è tenuta oggi al Fermilab, negli Stati Uniti, la cerimonia di posa della prima pietra di uno dei più importanti progetti per il futuro della fisica, in cui l’Italia porta un contributo tecnologico e scientifico di primo piano. Si tratta del progetto PIP-II (Proton Improvement Plan II) per la realizzazione di un nuovo acceleratore lineare superconduttore, lungo 215 metri.