Arts and Lecture Series

In this lecture, part III of the virtual lecture series, “How to do big science,” Deborah Harris talks about the construction of the MINERvA neutrino experiment at Fermilab. The MINERvA collaboration used a high-intensity neutrino beam to collect data on neutrino interactions with a wide variety of materials. Harris served as the project manager of detector construction, and in 2010, she was elected to be the scientific co-spokesperson of MINERvA.

Using neutrino experiments at Fermilab as an example, Jorge Morfin explains the path of a large physics experiment from inspiration through the proposal process to approval. The lecture is part II of the virtual lecture series, “How to do big science,” hosted by the Fermilab Arts & Lectures At Home Series.

From the Daily Herald, October 17, 2021: The Fermilab Arts and Lecture Series will continues with a virtual program titled, “Eat the Invaders: Can Harvesting Introduced Species Reduce Their Impact?” presented Dr. Joe Roman of the University of Vermont on November 19.

Video screenshot for Blackfoot Poetry

Corey Gray is a member of the Siksika Nation. In this public lecture, he presents a behind-the-scenes look at what it’s been like working at a land-based gravitational wave detector since 1998. Gray shares a “Top 3” list of his favorite detections, as well as the experience of a son having the opportunity to recruit his mother to work with him because of language—the language of spacetime and the Blackfoot people.

Fermilab guest composer David Ibbett composes electrosymphonic music, a fusion of classical and electronic styles. He visited Fermilab in January 2020 to learn more about neutrino research at the lab and started working on his first neutrino-inspired compositions. In this lecture, he presents the results of his work, with a guest appearance by neutrino scientist Bonnie Fleming.

From Daily Herald, Jan. 7, 2021: On Tuesday, Jan. 12, the Fermilab Art and Lecture Series will present its next virtual gallery talk on “Imagining Reality,” a photographic journey with Fermilab scientist Steve Geer. He will describe his artistic process as applied to various photographic projects that he’s exhibited in galleries and published in books and magazines.

It’s Fermilab’s 2019 Physics Slam! Five contestants get 10 minutes each to present their topic in the most interesting way possible as they compete for the title of Slam Champion. This year’s competition featured slams on neutrinos, science history, PIP-II and a personal journey in science.

If you didn’t get a chance to attend this year’s Physics Slam, never fear. It’s now available on the Fermilab YouTube channel. Presented by the Fermilab Arts and Lecture Series, the Physics Slam is a friendly competition between five contestants who each get 10 minutes to present their topic in the most interesting way possible. Champion is decided by audience vote. This year’s slammers were Fernanda Psihas, “Failure in physics”; Valerie Higgins, “Time-traveling through physics history”; Joe DalSanto, “How big…