From Ceska Televize (Czech Republic TV-right click to translate the page to English), June 6: A delegation from the Czech Republic visited Fermilab last week in which the scientific collaboration between Fermilab and the Czech Republic on DUNE was highlighted by Fermilab director Lia Merminga. See highlights of the delegation’s tour and interviews with Lia and Fermilab scientist Jaroslav Zalesak.

Artist rendering of Fermilab campus

The Department of Energy has formally approved the start of full construction for the PIP-II project, an upgrade to the Fermilab accelerator complex that includes a new linear accelerator. PIP-II is an essential enhancement that will power the world’s most intense high-energy neutrino beam. It is the first particle accelerator built in the United States with significant contributions from international partners.

From Innovation News Network, February 25, 2022: PIP-II project director Lia Merminga discusses the Fermilab accelerator complex upgrade being done in collaboration with research institutions in India, the UK, Italy, France, and Poland. Read more about the current status of PIP-II project, what it sets out to achieve and the impacts PIP-II will have on the future of particle physics research.

Neutrinos are powerful tools for better understanding how the universe works and improving our theories, like the famed Standard Model. But what else are neutrinos good for? Neutrino physicist Kirsty Duffy explains some of the (mostly not-so-practical) ways we might use neutrinos.

From The Conversation, December 21, 2021: Aaron McGowan, Principal Lecturer in Physics and Astronomy at the Rochester Institute of Technology explores research in 2021 in which physicists around the world ran a number of experiments that probed the Standard Model. From Higgs Boson, to Muon g-2 and the restart of the LHC at CERN, McGowan highlights some of the ways the Standard Model fails to explain every mystery of the universe.

Employees from Thyssen Mining complete construction of a temporary work platform over the main ore pass on the 4850 level. All blasted rock from the project will be dumped down this pass before being hoisted to surface.
A robotic shotcrete applicator waits to be lowered into the newly excavated 12-foot diameter, 1,200-foot tall ventilation raise at the LBNF FSCF project in Lead, South Dakota.