DUNE

A supernova's shockwave ejects the outer layers of the star in a catastrophic blast that can briefly shine more brightly than entire galaxies. Image: NASA

Particle detectors recorded neutrinos from supernova SN1987A hours before telescopes saw the first light. Thirty years later, scientists around the world are eager to detect neutrinos from another one. The international Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will be looking for them. These neutrinos can tell us more about supernovae themselves and may hint at new physics that could upend the Standard Model of particle physics.

From NPR’s Here & Now, March 19, 2019: Fermilab is a global center for research into a tiny particle that could help answer some of the biggest questions in physics: the neutrino. Neutrinos have no electrical charge and almost no mass, but they’re everywhere. Fermilab Director Nigel Lockyer and Fermilab Deputy Chief Research Officer Bonnie Fleming talk about the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, visit the NOvA experiment and discuss the benefits of fundamental research.

In this two-minute video, learn how scientists and engineers at universities and laboratories are working hand-in-hand with companies to design electronics, build hardware and develop computer programs for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility and the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab.

From Discover, March 12, 2019: Fermilab, along with the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, is starting a new project called the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, or DUNE. The goal is to track and study shadowy neutrinos like never before. Fermilab scientists Deborah Harris and Angela Fava discuss the experiment.

From The Bogota Post, Feb. 14, 2019: Building change stems from building new role models to get women out of unpaid labor roles and into the country’s laboratories and management boards. Role models include on of the scientists on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment.

From FAPESP, Feb. 13, 2019: Uma parte vital de um dos maiores experimentos da física de partículas atual foi desenvolvida no Brasil. O Arapuca é um detector de luz a ser instalado no Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment — projeto que busca descobrir novas propriedades dos neutrinos, partícula elementar com muito pouca massa e que viaja a uma velocidade muito próxima à da luz.

From University of Missouri – Kansas City’s University News, Feb. 6, 2019: Sánchez, a scientist at Iowa State University, is a part of Fermilab’s NOvA neutrino experiment and the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. She also co-leads the ANNIE experiment at Fermilab.