DUNE

“Why there is something, rather than nothing?” is a timeless question in both science and philosophy. In this video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explains the theory of leptogenesis, which might be the answer. The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will test this idea.

From Kelo, July 19, 2019: Fermilab’s Patrick Weber and others talk about the international, Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and its Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility in this 8-minute video. Sanford Underground Research Facility is home to the DUNE far detector, and the world-leading research taking place at there is giving scientists from a variety of disciplines a wealth of information about the universe, the geology of the region and life underground.

From Kelo, July 10, 2019: Fermilab’s Bonnie Fleming talks about neutrinos, the international, Fermilab-hosted DUNE and and LBNF in this 9-minute video on the research taking place one mile underground in Lead, South Dakota, at the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

From Rapid City Journal, July 12, 2019: Fermilab Director Nigel Lockyer was the guest for a free public speaker series held one day prior to Neutrino Day, a full day of neutrino-themed public activities in Lead. Lockyer spoke about is known as the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), housed in the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), which will have its South Dakota component at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in the former Homestake mine. It’s a billion-dollar international collaboration, and it’s described as the largest particle physics project ever built in the United States.

The Universities Research Association recognizes Fermilab scientist Laura Fields for her contributions to the field of accelerator-based neutrino physics. She co-leads the MINERvA experiment, which is making measurements necessary for tuning models of neutrino interactions used in ongoing and future neutrino experiments, and helped design a new focusing system for Fermilab’s LBNF neutrino beam.

From Exascale Computing Project, May 28, 2019: Fermilab scientist Andreas Kronfeld is featured in this piece on the Excascale Computing Project, quantum chromodynamics and lattice QCD. Kronfeld, the principal investigator of ECP’s LatticeQCD project, explains how exascale computing will be essential to extending the work of precision calculations in particle physics to nuclear physics. The calculations are central for interpreting all experiments in particle physics and nuclear physics.