DUNE

The conveyor belt taking the rocks from the crusher to the Open Cut passes close to the town of Lead, South Dakota. Image: Fermilab

Fermilab contractors have successfully commissioned a system that will move 800,000 tons of rock to create space for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment’s detectors in South Dakota. Excavation crews will transport the rock from a mile underground to the surface using refurbished mining infrastructure and the newly constructed conveyor system.

Sanford Underground Research Facility is making an effort to build bridges with Native American communities and operate with respect for the sacred land it is built on.

Take a virtual tour of the newly-upgraded Ross hoistroom and rock conveyance system at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Both the hoistroom and the conveyance system are critical to constructing LBNF and DUNE a mile below the surface.

Gina Rameika

On April 1, Gina Rameika assumed the role of co-spokesperson for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, elected by a collaboration of more than 1,000 physicists and engineers. DUNE, hosted by Fermilab, comprises people from more than 200 institutions in 33 countries.

From the Black Hills Pioneer, March 25, 2021: Ross Hoists will power the excavation of 800,000 tons of waste rock and serve as the conveyance for people, materials and equipment underground of the DUNE at LBNF.

Dr. Kirsty Duffy talks about how we can see the invisible with detectors. She shares the bizarre story of the first neutrino detector: Project Poltergeist. Plus, MicroBooNE scientist Katrina Miller shows us the materials used to build modern detectors — and what scientists see when a neutrino finally says hello.