collaboration

This is PIP-II's very first low-beta 650-MHz cavity, which arrived at Fermilab on May 14. It is a present from the Italian institute INFN and was made by E. Zanon S.p.A. PIP-II, accelerator technology, accelerator, INFN, collaboration Photo: Andrew Penhollow

This is PIP-II’s very first low-beta 650-MHz cavity, which arrived at Fermilab on May 21. It is a present from the Italian institution INFN and was made by E. Zanon.

For the last six years, the mission of U.S. CMS scientists has been, in a phrase, to complete the LHC Phase 1 Upgrades. On May 1, with the successful outcome of the DOE Critical Decision 4 review, the U.S. CMS group fulfilled that mission. We’re proud of all the work we’ve done to upgrade the CMS detector so it can handle the increased luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider.

From Physics World, April 23, 2019: Fermilab Archivist Valerie Higgins discusses how the contributions of support staff should not be forgotten when it comes to celebrating scientific breakthroughs. Modern scientific research is often conducted through large organizational structures and thousands of participants. For archivists and others interested in the history of scientific research, developing a complete picture requires an understanding not only of the work that scientists and technical staff do but also the contributions of support staff too.

Scientist Jean-Paul Carneiro and collaborators in France are setting the stage for one of the world’s first autonomous particle accelerators. They will incorporate the world’s leading code for computing the dynamics of particle beams into a Fermilab prototype. Funding is provided through the FACCTS program, which fosters productive partnerships between Chicago-based and French researchers.

From UChicago News, Feb. 28, 2019: The Chicago Quantum Exchange, a growing hub for the research and development of quantum technology, is adding the University of Wisconsin–Madison as its newest member. UW–Madison is joining forces with the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, Fermilab, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in developing a national leading collaboration in the rapidly emerging field of quantum information.

“Wait,” you may be thinking, “I thought this was a science column. What has science to do with peace?” Those who visit Fermilab or CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Switzerland, understand. There are today many international scientific organizations, at least partly inspired by CERN’s success.

The building boom

These international projects, selected during the process to plan the future of U.S. particle physics, are all set to come online within the next 10 years.

From Indian Times Daily, April 16, 2018: U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry and India’s Atomic Energy Secretary Sekhar Basu signed an agreement in New Delhi to expand the two countries’ collaboration on world-leading science and technology projects.

From World Nuclear News, April 17, 2018: Energy Secretary Rick Perry and India’s Atomic Energy Secretary Sekhar Basu signed an agreement in New Delhi that opens the way to jointly advancing cutting-edge neutrino science projects under way in both countries, LBNF/DUNE