neutrino

A woman with long wavy brown hair wearing a black T-shirt holds a banana in one hand. She is in front of a turquoise gradient background with question marks on it. In the lower left corner is an illustration of a banana. Across the middle the text "Viewer Questions!"

Fermilab scientist Kirsty Duffy responds to some of the many wonderful questions viewers have left in the comments. Plus, a guest visit from fellow Fermilab science communicator Don Lincoln.

From Sanford Lab, July 2021: Explore all the Neutrino Day events July 9-10 to talk with scientists, participate in interactive activities, experience weird science demonstrations, take virtual tours of the underground, and visit the art gallery and library—all in real time! Use the free and simple platform, Gather.town, to virtually go to Neutrino Day town where you can enjoy the events and interact with others as you would in real life.

A woman with a black shirt looks concerned and holds a banana in one hand. To the right of her, an illustration of a sun-like object that says "The Solar Neutrino Problem" in the middle of it. An illustration of three bananas is in the right-hand corner. Different flavors of neutrinos appear to come out of the sun-like object. Two electron neutrinos are in dark brown, other neutrinos are light in shade.

Throw on your shades: Today on #EvenBananas, we’re looking at particles from the sun — and how trillions of them went missing. Join Fermilab scientist Kirsty Duffy to explore how an experiment using 100,000 gallons of dry cleaning fluid a mile underground led to one of the biggest mysteries in particle physics: the solar neutrino problem.

From the Black Hills Pioneer, June 20, 2021: The former Homestake Gold Mine was the largest and deepest in the western hemisphere and today it is the largest science project attempted on U.S. soil. The LBNF/DUNE includes a collaboration of more than 1,300 scientists from 32 countries. Read more about the significant impacts LBNF/DUNE is having on South Dakota.

An illustration. I person stands inside a giant, hollow gold cube and sends a signal using a device to another device on the left side of the screen that is close up and held in a hand. The close-up device says "counting" and has some numbers. In the bottom right-hand corner, it says LBNF/DUNE.

When studying mysterious subatomic particles, researchers at SURF in South Dakota use a different kind of particle detector, particle counters, to prevent run-of-the-mill dust particles from creating background noise and obscuring results.

A cartoon of a hand dropping a mic. "Physics Slam" is written in stylized orange to the right of the illustration. Fermilab logo runs across the bottom.

In the 2021 Fermilab Physics Slam, each contender had 10 minutes to present their topic in the most interesting way possible. This annual favorite was presented in a new, virtual format, with a Zoom audience choosing the Physics Slam Champion.