neutrino

A new 20,000-pound particle detection system built for a neutrino experiment will be transported 3 miles across the Fermilab campus today. About the size of a small house, it will be the heart of the Short-Baseline Near Detector at Fermilab.

From the Black Hills Pioneer, November 12, 2022: How do you fit a 3.5 ton piece of steel that is 6 meters long and 2.5 meters wide safely down the Ross Shaft at Sanford Lab? Justin Evans, a professor at Manchester University, explains how the anode plane assembly traveled from the UK to Lead, SD and its roles as a key component to the DUNE experiment.

Pound for pound, of all the particles with mass, neutrinos are the fastest, almost traveling at the speed of light … but not quite. So exactly how fast are they? Neutrino physicist Kirsty Duffy and Durham University neutrino theorist Jessica Turner discuss how fast the elusive neutrinos can travel.

From Science, September 29, 2022: Fermilab’s DUNE and Japan’s Hyper-K experiments are building similar yet different projects that will study neutrino oscillations and search for CP violation in hopes it will lead to answers on how the newborn universe generated more matter than antimatter. Read more on how these two projects are progressing, how they differ and how they might answer more about the elusive neutrino.

From Science News, September 22, 2022: Emily Conover explains in this video why the universe contain so much more matter than antimatter told through the lens of a classic, 8-bit video game, with matter and antimatter locked in an epic battle for cosmic supremacy. Experiments like DUNE will examine ghostly subatomic particles known as neutrinos to provide clues.

After the successful initiation of two new detectors, scientists have begun to envision an expanded suite of neutrino experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

From Syracuse University, September 18, 2022: Researchers at Syracuse University have received two new grants that will expand their work with physicists from around the world on projects that include MicroBooNE, DUNE and NOvA. The support comes from the NSF and DOE and will enable graduate and undergraduate students to work on everything from detector construction and operation at Fermilab and Syracuse, to final data analysis and software development.