neutrino

From Eifel Zeitung, Sept. 5, 2019: Das nächste große Neutrinoexperiment DUNE am Fermilab in Chicago wollen sie maßgeblich mitgestalten und sind dabei nun einen wichtigen Schritt vorangekommen: Verantwortliche von Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz und Fermilab haben eine Vereinbarung zur gemeinsamen Berufung einer international renommierten Forscherpersönlichkeit unterzeichnet.

From CNRS, Aug. 30, 2019: A scientist at the French National Center for Scientific Research talks about neutrinos and the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, in this 2-minute video.

The Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany, has taken a significant step to participate in the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab. Fermilab and the university have signed an agreement to jointly appoint an internationally renowned researcher who will strengthen the experimental particle physics research program at JGU Mainz and advance a German contribution to DUNE. This is the first Fermilab joint agreement with a university in Germany.

Four early-career scientists on the Fermilab MicroBooNE experiment were recently recognized for their “excellence in poster presentation, the technical merit of the work presented, and the poster’s visual appeal and story-telling.” They placed in poster contests at three recent meetings.

The NA61/SHINE experiment was originally designed to study the transition between ordinary matter and quark-gluon plasma in collisions of heavy ions. But it turns out that the experiment is also able to make essential measurements for a very different field: accelerator-based neutrino physics. NA61/SHINE can make very precise measurements of the interactions that happen in neutrino beams.

From Science, Aug. 8, 2019: Fermilab physicists are resurrecting a massive particle detector by lowering it into a tomblike pit and embalming it with a chilly fluid. In August, workers eased two gleaming silver tanks bigger than shipping containers, the two halves of the detector, into a concrete-lined hole. Hauled from Europe two years ago, ICARUS will soon start a second life seeking perhaps the strangest particles physicists have dreamed up, oddballs called sterile neutrinos.