particle accelerator

Neutrinos are neutral, meaning the magnets in a particle accelerator can’t manipulate them. So how can scientists make a dense beam of neutrinos for their experiments? Neutrino physicist Kirsty Duffy and Fermilab accelerator operator Laura Bolt explain the power of protons and how teams can generate intense beams of neutrinos using particle accelerators.

From World Nuclear News, December 7, 2021: A neutrino detection kit has been installed in the containment of Argentina’s Atucha 2 reactor in support of a US-Argentine experiment to learn more about the mysterious particles. Scientists of the vIOLETTA Project are using sensitive Skipper CCD equipment designed and prepared by Fermilab and Berkeley labs. It will be able to detect interactions between neutrinos and a silicon matrix. The experimental arrangement will give them insights on neutrinos at previously unexplored low energy ranges.

From New Atlas, December 1, 2021: Neutrino research and other experiments may have new magnets to use in the future. Physicists at Fermilab have developed a superconducting magnet that can perform at high temperatures and higher field strength. Read more about the work of Vladimir Shiltsev and Alexander Zlobin.

From the Cornell Chronicle, September 20, 2021: A collaboration of researchers led by Cornell has been awarded $22.5 million by the NSF to continue research needed to transform the brightness of electron beams. Fermilab scientists Sergei Nagaitsev and Sam Posen are part of the collaboration team working with Cornell to improve the performance and reduce the cost of accelerator technologies that would improve beams for tumor treatment, imaging individual atoms, instruments for wafer metrology, and the Large Hadron Collider.

From Fraction magazine, September 2021: Former Fermilab artist-in-residence Adam Nadel featured striking photos of an electron beam from a particle accelerator. In a recent issue of this magazine, he used a stream of subatomic electron particles interacting with the silver halide salt found in color photographic paper. The beam was generated on a LINAC electron particle accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory when Nadel was the resident artist in 2018.

Man in white shirt sitting at desk, signing documents

Fermilab signed three international arrangements in June with the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, known as INFN. The three arrangements are related to Fermilab’s Short Baseline Neutrino Program, the PIP-II particle accelerator and the EuPRAXIA advanced accelerator project.

Fahim AI on-chip data processing work

The U.S. Department of Energy awarded Farah Fahim an Early Career Research Award to investigate how deploying neural networks and machine learning on a particle detector can allow data processing at source. Her work could make data processing at detectors more efficient, improving fundamental research at physics facilities like the LHC at CERN.