In the news

From The Hamden Journal, January 16, 2022: With the Standard Model explaining the fundamental physics of how the universe works, experimental physicists are constantly probing for cracks in the model’s foundations. So far, it has remained the model of fundamental physics despite many experiments in 2021 that probed the Standard Model 2021 like Muon g-2.

From Engineering Update, January 6, 2022: Illinois-based Caldwell Group Inc. has customized a lifting frame that may be used in the summer of 2022 during transatlantic transportation of cryomodules to Fermilab for the Proton Improvement Program II (PIP-II) project. STFC-UKRI in the UK designed and assembled the lifting frame to meet impact, vibration, lifting, and transport load requirements in both the United States and Europe.

From Business AM (Belgium), January 1, 2022: In 2021, physicists around the world conducted some interesting experiments examining the Standard Model and ways it can’t explain every mystery of the universe. Last April, members of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab announced their first measurement of the muon’s magnetic moment. This experiment was important was because the measurement did not perfectly match the Standard Model’s prediction of the magnetic moment.

From The Conversation, December 21, 2021: Aaron McGowan, Principal Lecturer in Physics and Astronomy at the Rochester Institute of Technology explores research in 2021 in which physicists around the world ran a number of experiments that probed the Standard Model. From Higgs Boson, to Muon g-2 and the restart of the LHC at CERN, McGowan highlights some of the ways the Standard Model fails to explain every mystery of the universe.

From Discover Magazine, December 19, 2021: In April, an international collaboration of more than 200 scientists, led by Fermilab reported findings that may open a door to physics that transcends the Standard Model. Muon g-2’s magnetic moment goes beyond the Standard Model.

From Blog Sicilia (Italy), December 15, 2021: From Marsala to Chicago, a young Sicilian among the most important scientists in the world. Fermilab’s Anna Grassellino is a researcher from Marsala chosen by the DOE to lead a project that will build the quantum computer: a revolutionary machine that will lead to a new era of research. In Chicago, she is among the most important scientists in the world.

From Science, December 16, 2021: And the winner is….Science has declared AI-driven software that offers insights into basic biology and revealing promising new drug targets the Breakthrough of 2021. The Muon g-2 story, At last, a crack in particle physics’ standard model?, was among the finalists in this impressive listing of science innovations that occurred this year. Read more about the winner and other amazing science discoveries recognized by Science.