LBNF/DUNE news

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LBNF/DUNE/PIP-II/SBN media articles

From Futurism, Aug. 19, 2020: When an ambitious new Fermilab-hosted experiment called DUNE begins its work, physicists believe they’ll be able to learn a whole lot more about supernova explosions than ever before. That’s because DUNE is expected to be sensitive to an extremely elusive particle called a neutrino that’s blasted far and wide across the cosmos when a star explodes. According to a new paper shared online on Saturday, physicists expect DUNE to scoop up a never-before-detected kind of neutrino and, in doing so, break down why and how stars die in unprecedented detail.

From Rapid City Journal, Aug. 6, 2020: Crews have begun installing a rock conveyor over U.S. Highway 85 in Lead, South Dakota, for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility. The conveyor will bring 800,000 tons of rock from the 4850 level of Sanford Underground Research Facility and deposit them into an open pit mining area that was excavated by the Homestake Gold Mine in the 1980s, making way for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab.

From Black Hills Pioneer, July 22, 2020: Since late 2019, work has been under way on the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility conveyor system at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The system will carry more than 800,000 tons of rock excavated from the site of the international, Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment 4,850-feet below the surface. A major milestone for the project was met on July 20 as the 120-foot section of the truss, which will house the conveyor, was erected above the highway.

From Physics Today, June 1, 2020: Somewhere in the laws of physics, particles must be allowed to behave differently from their antiparticles. If they weren’t, the universe would contain equal amounts of matter and antimatter, all the particles and antiparticles would promptly annihilate one another, and none of us would exist. Fermilab’s NOvA neutrino experiment and the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, are pinning down CP violation, the property that could explain the imbalance.

From Gizmodo, May 18, 2020: Neutrino physics is a trek into the unknown, one that the United States physics community has chosen to pursue full-on. A flagship experiment called LBNF/DUNE will lead the search, in pursuit of answers that may take decades or more to find. Fermilab Deputy Director for Research Joe Lykken, DUNE spokesperson Ed Blucher, and DUNE scientists Chang Kee Jung and Elizabeth Worcester talk about how neutrinos will enhance our understanding of the universe.

From Quanta Magazine, April 15, 2020: The first official evidence of a key imbalance between neutrinos and antineutrinos provides one of the best clues for why the universe contains something rather than nothing. Fermilab scientist Debbie Harris comments on the T2K experiment’s latest result. Fermilab’s NOvA experiment and the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will also help provide a more precise understanding of the asymmetry.

From Space.com, April 15, 2020: A new study from the T2K experiment looked hard for signs of CP symmetry violation in neutrinos and came up with some intriguing results. The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will provide complementary techniques and measurements that may provide a more definitive answer in the quest for CP violation.

From Science, April 15, 2020: Neutrinos behave differently from their antimatter counterparts, antineutrinos, report physicists on the T2K experiment. The result is far from conclusive, but the asymmetry, known as CP violation, could help explain how the newborn universe generated more matter than antimatter. NOvA spokesperson Patricia Vahle of William & Mary comments on the T2K result and NOvA’s measurements of CP violation. When the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, comes online, it will be able to make more precise measurements of neutrinos’ behavior.

From New Scientist, April 15, 2020: Differences between matter and antimatter, called CP violation, have been measured in some particles, called quarks, but the level isn’t nearly enough to explain the observed imbalance between matter and antimatter. The T2K collaboration has observed hints that CP violation in neutrinos may be able to make up the difference. DUNE spokesperson Ed Blucher of the University of Chicago comments on the result.

From Nature, April 15, 2020: In a mirror world, antiparticles should behave in the same way as particles. But it emerges that neutrinos, electrons and their more exotic cousins might not obey this expected pattern. Fermilab scientist Jessica Turner and Durham University scientist Silvia Pascoli provide a commentary on T2K’s recent neutrino result, CP violation, and how other neutrino experiments, including the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will make more precise measurements of the mysterious neutrino’s behavior.

From The New York Times, April 15, 2020: An international team of 500 physicists from 12 countries, known as the T2K collaboration, reported that they had measured a slight but telling difference between neutrinos and their opposites, antineutrinos. Fermilab Deputy Director Joe Lykken comments on the result and how the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, may be able to make a definitive discovery of CP violation.

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LBNF/DUNE/PIP-II/SBN Fermilab-produced articles and videos

Scientists are testing the components and systems for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, with other liquid-argon particle detectors. One such detector is ICEBERG, which is over 10,000 times smaller than DUNE will be. ICEBERG’s measurements are providing insight for future neutrino experiments.

The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment collaboration has published a paper about its capability for performing supernova physics. It details the kind of activity DUNE expects in the detector during a supernova burst, how DUNE will know once a supernova occurs and what physics DUNE will extract from the neutrinos. DUNE’s unique strength is its sensitivity to a particular type of neutrino called the electron neutrino, which will provide scientists with supernova data not available from any other experiment.

The PIP-II project at Fermilab includes the construction of a 215-meter-long particle accelerator that will accelerate particles to 84% of the speed of light. Research institutions in France, India, Italy, Poland, the UK and the United States are building major components of the new machine. The new particle accelerator will enable Fermilab to generate an unprecedented stream of neutrinos — subtle, subatomic particles that could hold the key to understanding the universe’s evolution.

Construction workers have carried out the first underground blasting for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, which will provide the space, infrastructure and particle beam for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. This prep work paves the way for removing more than 800,000 tons of rock to make space for the gigantic DUNE detector a mile underground.

In this 5-minute video, Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia explains why mysterious particles called neutrinos could be the key to understanding the nature of the universe. He talks about the search for a fourth type of neutrino and why the universe would not exist without neutrinos. He describes how scientists aim to unveil the secrets of the neutrino with the ICARUS and DUNE neutrino experiments, hosted by Fermilab. He recalls why early in his career he chose liquid argon as his material of choice to collect information about neutrino interactions with matter.

The 29th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics brings together thousands of researchers for the latest developments in the field.

Fermilab is currently upgrading its accelerator complex to produce the world’s most powerful beam of high-energy neutrinos. To generate these particles, the accelerators will send an intense beam of protons traveling near the speed of light through a maze of particle accelerator components before passing through metallic “windows” and colliding with a stationary target. Researchers are testing the endurance of windows made of a titanium alloy, exposing samples to high-intensity proton beams to see how well the material will perform.

The detector for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will collect massive amounts of data from star-born and terrestrial neutrinos. A single supernova burst could provide as much as 100 terabytes of data. A worldwide network of computers will provide the infrastructure and bandwidth to help store and analyze it. Using artificial intelligence and machine learning, scientists are writing software to mine the data – to better understand supernovae and the evolution of our universe.

Of all of the inhabitants of the subatomic realm, it is said that neutrinos have surprised researchers more than the rest. In episode 4 of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln both introduces you to these perplexing fundamental particles and answers some fascinating viewers’ questions. View the 11-minute video.

When scientists begin taking data with the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment in the mid-2020s, they’ll be able to peer 13.8 billion years into the past and address one of the biggest unanswered questions in physics: Why is there more matter than antimatter? To do this, they’ll send a beam of neutrinos on an 800-mile journey from Fermilab to Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. To detect neutrinos, researchers at several DOE national laboratories, including Fermilab, are developing integrated electronic circuitry that can operate in DUNE’s detectors — at temperatures around minus 200 degrees Celsius. They plan to submit their designs this summer.

 

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LBNF/DUNE/PIP-II/SBN articles produced by U.S. and international partners

From Sanford Underground Research Facility, Aug. 4, 2020: The most publicly visible milestone of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility’s pre-excavation work, a conveyor system, now extends over U.S. Highway 85 in Lead, South Dakota. Installation of the conveyor is one of a series of infrastructure strengthening projects undertaken to prepare the Sanford Underground Research Facility for its role as LBNF’s far site. Such projects lay the groundwork for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, the most ambitious particle physics experiment on U.S. soil, hosted by Fermilab.

From CERN Courier, July 7, 2020: A new generation of accelerator and reactor experiments is opening an era of high-precision neutrino measurements to tackle questions such as leptonic CP violation, the mass hierarchy and the possibility of a fourth “sterile” neutrino. These include the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, and Fermilab’s NOvA and Short-Baseline Neutrino programs.

From Sanford Underground Research Facility, May 26, 2020: Unwilling to ignore flaws in the Standard Model, physicists are looking for a new, more perfect model of the subatomic universe. And many are hoping that the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, can put their theories to the test.

From Sanford Underground Research Facility, May 19, 2020: The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will be tuned to see neutrinos streaming from a nearby supernova. Such neutrino interactions could give researchers insight into one of the explosive processes that formed the elements in our solar system and our planet.

From the University of Bern, May 2020: The University of Bern and Fermilab partner on three neutrino projects aimed at a thorough study of some postulated properties of the ghostly particle: MicroBooNE, SBND and the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, the latter to be considered the world’s ultimate neutrino observatory.

From Sanford Underground Research Facility, May 12, 2020: Part I in Sanford Lab’s series exploring the science goals of the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment discusses antimatter, CP violation and the origins of the universe.

From INFN, April 9, 2020: L’industria di solito non utilizza l’elettronica che opera a temperature criogeniche, perciò i fisici delle particelle hanno dovuto costruirsela da sé. Una collaborazione tra numerosi laboratori nazionali afferenti al Dipartimento dell’Energia, incluso il Fermilab, ha sviluppato prototipi dell’elettronica che verrà alla fine utilizzata nell’esperimento internazionale DUNE – Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, ospitato dal Fermilab.

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