The LBNF/DUNE team has had two main focus areas: gaining the approvals necessary to start early construction at the project’s far site at Sanford Lab in 2017 and prototyping the various systems that will eventually be scaled up and installed in DUNE’s massive underground neutrino detector.

Deep in the dense core of a black hole, protons and electrons are squeezed together to form neutrons, sending ghostly particles called neutrinos streaming out. Matter falls inward. In the textbook case, matter rebounds and erupts, leaving a neutron star. But sometimes, the supernova fails, and there’s no explosion; instead, a black hole is born. Scientists hope to use neutrino experiments to watch a black hole form.