Kurt Riesselmann

Kurt Riesselmann is a senior writer in the Fermilab Office of Communication.

This month, Thyssen Mining Inc. was awarded the contract to excavate the gigantic caverns for Fermilab’s Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility. Excavation crews will drill, blast and remove approximately 800,000 tons of rock to create the underground space for LBNF. When complete, the facility will house the enormous particle detector for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab.

Missing March Madness? Let Fermilab fill a small part of the void created in these times of social distancing and shelter-in-place. Participate in Fermilab’s sendup of the NCAA tournament: March Magnets. Learn about eight different types of magnets used in particle physics, each with an example from a project or experiment in which Fermilab is a player. Then head over to the Fermilab Twitter feed on March 30 to participate in our March Magnets playoffs.

Scientists Luke Pickering, Kirsty Duffy and Anne Norrick met for a work party on Feb. 27. With music playing in the background, they prepared handouts for an outreach event in March. people, lab life Photo: Kurt Riesselmann

Scientists Luke Pickering, Kirsty Duffy and Anne Norrick met for a work party on Feb. 27. With music playing in the background, they prepared handouts for an outreach event in March.

Advances in subatomic physics heavily depend on ingenuity and technology. And when it comes to discovering the nature of some of the most elusive particles in the universe, neutrinos, scientists need the best and most sensitive detector technology possible. Scientists working at CERN have started tests of a new neutrino detector prototype, using a very promising technology called “dual phase.”