muon

From Argonne National Laboratory, April 19, 2018: Scientists from Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, along with collaborators from over 25 other institutions, are recreating a previous experiment with much higher precision.

The 50-foot-wide superconducting electromagnet at the center of the experiment saw its first beam of muon particles from Fermilab’s accelerators, kicking off a three-year effort to measure just what happens to those particles when placed in a stunningly precise magnetic field. The answer could rewrite scientists’ picture of the universe and how it works.

From Nature, April 11, 2017: Fermilab’s Muon g-2 experiment will measure the muon’s magnetic moment with unparalleled precision, perhaps revealing unknown virtual particles.

A doctoral student and his adviser designed a tabletop particle detector they hope to make accessible to budding young engineering physicists.

The Muon g-2 experiment will measure of the strength of the magnetic field of a subatomic particle called a muon. If the measurement doesn’t overlap with the predicted value, it could point to the scientific community’s next big breakthrough, and we may have to rewrite the textbooks.