muon

From Live Science, Feb. 8, 2018: Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln writes an article for Live Science on the Muon g-2 experiment and how the results could potentially punch a hole in the reigning Standard Model of particle physics.

The 50-foot-wide superconducting electromagnet at the center of the experiment saw its first beam of muon particles from Fermilab’s accelerators, kicking off a three-year effort to measure just what happens to those particles when placed in a stunningly precise magnetic field. The answer could rewrite scientists’ picture of the universe and how it works.

From Nature, April 11, 2017: Fermilab’s Muon g-2 experiment will measure the muon’s magnetic moment with unparalleled precision, perhaps revealing unknown virtual particles.

A doctoral student and his adviser designed a tabletop particle detector they hope to make accessible to budding young engineering physicists.

The Muon g-2 experiment will measure of the strength of the magnetic field of a subatomic particle called a muon. If the measurement doesn’t overlap with the predicted value, it could point to the scientific community’s next big breakthrough, and we may have to rewrite the textbooks.

The forthcoming Mu2e experiment at Fermilab will kidnap muons and trap them in aluminum atoms. But what exactly happens when you shoot a muon at an aluminum foil? While Mu2e is under construction, its scientists are already getting some valuable answers from a smaller accomplice: AlCap.