dark matter

A man with short gray hair and glasses smiles. He is wearing a black blazer and a black T-shirt that reads "Physics is everything." He is in front of a starry sky. To his right, text that says "Can we find dark matter?" In the lower right-hand corner, an illustration of an atom.

Dark matter remains one of the unsolved mysteries of modern physics. In this video, Fermilab’s Don Lincoln explains two innovative methods whereby Fermilab scientists look for types of dark matter the broader community largely overlooks.

From Department of Energy, June 28, 2021: DOE announces $93 million in funding for 71 research projects that will spur new discoveries in high-energy physics. The projects—housed at 50 colleges and universities across 29 states—are exploring the basics of energy science that underlie technological advancements in medicine, computing, energy technologies, manufacturing, national security and more.

From Kathimerini (Greece), June 14, 2021: A multinational team of 400 researchers from 25 research centers in seven countries announced the results of the DES study that looked at 226 million galaxies and thousands of supernova explosions. The DES measurements, like those of other similar galactic surveys, informed us that the current universe is less dense than our model predicts.

From Cosmos, May 29, 2021: The Dark Energy Survey collaboration released the most precise look at the universe’s evolution to understand dark matter and dark energy by studying how they shape the large-scale structure of the universe.

A starry night sky with purple diagonal stripe from lower left to upper right corner above an observatory lit up in bright red. A shadow of a building or facility is in the lower right corner.

The Dark Energy Survey collaboration has created the largest ever maps of the distribution and shapes of galaxies, tracing both ordinary and dark matter in the universe out to a distance of over 7 billion light years. The analysis, which includes the first three years of data from the survey, is consistent with predictions from the current best model of the universe, the standard cosmological model. Nevertheless, there remain hints from DES and other experiments that matter in the current universe is a few percent less clumpy than predicted.