dark matter

From U Chicago News, April 12, 2022: Scientists from the University of Chicago and Fermilab have released an innovative new design for an experiment called the the Broadband Reflector Experiment for Axion Detection (BREAD) to find the mysterious substance is known as dark matter. BREAD, is especially promising because it can look for possible axions with a range of different masses.

In this lecture, Marcela Carena, head of the Theory Division at Fermilab and professor of physics at the University of Chicago, talks about “The unseen universe: Challenges for theory and experiment.” She explains how theorists think about the Higgs boson, neutrinos, dark matter and the exciting results from the Fermilab Muon g-2 experiment announced last year, and how these ideas can lead to new experiments and discoveries.

A technique from the newest generation of quantum sensors is helping scientists to use the limitations of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle to their advantage.

The cosmic microwave background is the fossil remnant of the fireball of the Big Bang. Aside from demonstrating that the Big Bang happened, it can tell us how big the universe is and how much dark matter and energy the universe contains. In this video, Fermilab’s Don Lincoln guides you through this interesting topic.

From Wired, December 5, 2021: Years of conflicting measurements have led physicists to propose a “dark sector” of invisible particles that could explain dark matter and the universe’s expansion. Now, four analyses released yesterday by the MicroBooNE experiment from Fermilab and another recent study from the IceCube detector at the South Pole both suggest that these more complex neutrino theories may be on the right track—though the future remains far from clear.

Dark matter in seven acts

Follow the story of dark matter from the Big Bang to the death of the universe and hear the tale of the 95% of our universe made of dark energy and dark matter. Each act will feature a different point in the history of dark matter, from its creation, to its discovery, to its role in the ultimate end of our universe. Fermilab scientist Dan Bauer and his colleagues weave these events into a compelling narrative, using images, animation and current data.