Standard Model

From the Universities Research Association, October 31, 2022: Brynn MacCoy is a physics doctoral candidate at the University of Washington and the Fall 2019 URA Visiting Scholar Program (VSP) Awardee. With an extension of URA assistance, MacCoy returned to Fermilab earlier this year allowing her to install the Minimally Intrusive Scintillating Fiber Detector.

From Scientific American, October 2022: For several decades after the invention of the Standard Model, several physics measurements suggest that novel particles and forces exist in the universe. This article was originally published and titled, “When Particles Break the Rules” and includes the combined results from the Fermilab g-2 experiment and the previous trial at Brookhaven that add up to a probability of less than 0.01 percent that this anomaly is a statistical fluke.

From Brookhaven National Laboratory, October 11, 2022: Brookhaven National Lab announced yesterday that two of their scientists who led the “E821 g-2” experiment at BNL from 1990 through 2004 received the APS’s 2023 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. William M. Morse and Bradley Lee Roberts received the honor for their leadership and technical ingenuity in achieving a measurement of the muon anomalous magnetic moment with a precision suitable to probe Standard Model.

From Science News, August 15, 2022: W bosons are particles that transmit the weak force, which is responsible for certain types of radioactive decay. Last April, Fermilab researchers reported the W boson was more massive than predicted, hinting that something may be amiss with the standard model. Now a team of scientists with ATLAS at the LHC are reporting rare boson triplets which continues to test the standard model for any cracks.

Dark matter is invisible; it’s everywhere; and it doesn’t interact with matter very often. The same is true for neutrinos. So are neutrinos dark matter? Neutrino physicist Kirsty Duffy and neutrino/dark matter researcher Asher Kaboth (Royal Holloway, University of London) break down the most likely dark matter candidates and where neutrinos fit into the mix.

On July 4, 2012, researchers at the CERN laboratory in Europe announced the discovery of the Higgs boson. It was a tremendous triumph for the Standard Model of particle physics and confirmed a prediction made nearly half a century prior. In 2022, we celebrate the 10th anniversary of that momentous discovery.