magnetic moment

From How Stuff Works, July 1, 2021: Fermilab’s Muon g-2 result announcement in April 2021 introduced the world to the muon. Although the particle was first discovered in the late 1930’s, the muon made international headlines confirming previous findings that the muon behaves in a way that contradicts the Standard Model of Particle Physics.

From Physics Today, June 1, 2021: How do you transport a 15 000-kilogram magnetic ring with the same width as a basketball court from central Long Island to suburban Chicago? In 2011 Fermilab shut down its particle collider, the Tevatron, which made space to host a project like Muon g – 2, to house the high-intensity proton source that would generate the muons.

From Pour la Science, May 19, 2021: Is the Standard Model of Particle Physics at fault? The comparison of the first results of the Muon g – 2 experiment on the measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and the most recent theoretical results does not yet allow a conclusion.

From Forbes, April 7, 2021: Don Lincoln, senior scientist at Fermilab, explains that a new measurement announced by Fermilab last week goes a long way towards telling us if the venerable theory will need revising.

A super-precise experiment at Fermilab is carefully analyzing every detail of the muon’s magnetic moment. The Fermilab Muon g-2 collaboration has announced it will present its first result at 10 a.m. CDT on April 7.

From Scientific American, Dec. 16, 2020: Researchers have made the most precise measurement of one of the fundamental constants, called the fine-structure constant. Now all eyes are on Fermilab, where the first results of the Muon g-2 experiment are expected to provide the most precise experimental measurement of the muon’s magnetic moment. Alex Keshavarzi, scientist on the Muon g-2 experiment, weighs in on the significance of the measurement.