Fermilab

Einstein’s equation E = mc2and the theory of the Big Bang are both generally accepted physics theories, and yet, between them, they make an unphysical prediction. They predict that matter and antimatter should be observed in equal quantities. Yet the universe is made only of matter. Why is that? In this 11-minute episode of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explains what is going on.

Mysteries abound in the universe, including the universe’s ultimate fate. In this episode of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln talks about the observation of a new form of energy called dark energy, which will determine the future of the cosmos.

We know very little about what happened in the first seconds after the Big Bang. In this public lecture, author and Fermilab physicist Dan Hooper examines how physicists are using the Large Hadron Collider and other experiments to re-create the conditions of the Big Bang and to address mysteries such as how our universe came to contain so much matter and so little antimatter.

The existence or nonexistence of dark matter is a pressing and modern problem in physics. Something makes galaxies spin too fast, but nobody knows just what. In this episode of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln talks about the ongoing debate and points to two observations that make scientists more confident that dark matter is a real thing.

There are mysteries in the cosmos that general relativity can’t explain, such as how galaxies rotate and how clusters of galaxies move. Scientists have ideas as to possible explanations. In this 13-minute episode of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln lists some of the most pressing mysteries.

The new Superconducting Quantum Materials and Systems Center, based at Fermilab, brings together world-class experts from 20 institutions to take on one of the biggest challenges in quantum science: extending the lifetimes of quantum states. In this 4-minute video, SQMS Center Director Anna Grassellino talks about the center’s ambitious goals, including the building and deployment of a revolutionary quantum computer.

A reasonable question of physics is whether there is a smallest possible size and shortest duration. Some scientists have claimed that there are: the Planck length and Planck time. In the 20th episode of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explains the truth of the Planck constants. It’s not what you think.

What is dark matter made of? Scientists at Fermilab are using ultrasensitive devices to look for the elusive particles that would explain the nature of dark matter. In this 3-minute video, physicist Javier Tiffenberg explains how a new detection technology, based on sensors known as skipper charge-coupled devices, or CCDs, provides a new way of looking for dark matter particles.

Black holes live up to their name. They emit no light and they’re usually very far away. This makes it hard to take pictures of them, and indeed, some people claimed that they might not exist. But that’s no longer true. In episode 19 of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln tells us how we are quite sure that black holes are real.

Black holes seem to be timeless, lurking in the cosmos, forever eating and growing. However, astronomers believe that there is a way for black holes to shrink in size and eventually evaporate away. In episode 18 of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln talks about Hawking radiation, the ultimate fate of black holes.