antineutrino

From Quanta Magazine, April 15, 2020: The first official evidence of a key imbalance between neutrinos and antineutrinos provides one of the best clues for why the universe contains something rather than nothing. Fermilab scientist Debbie Harris comments on the T2K experiment’s latest result. Fermilab’s NOvA experiment and the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will also help provide a more precise understanding of the asymmetry.

From BBC News, April 16, 2020: Stars, galaxies, planets, pretty much everything that makes up our everyday lives owes its existence to a cosmic quirk. The nature of this quirk, which allowed matter to dominate the universe at the expense of antimatter, remains a mystery. Now, results from the T2K experiment in Japan has given strong hints that the CP violation effect could be large for neutrinos. The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, might detect the effect faster than expected.

From Space.com, April 15, 2020: A new study from the T2K experiment looked hard for signs of CP symmetry violation in neutrinos and came up with some intriguing results. The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will provide complementary techniques and measurements that may provide a more definitive answer in the quest for CP violation.

From Science, April 15, 2020: Neutrinos behave differently from their antimatter counterparts, antineutrinos, report physicists on the T2K experiment. The result is far from conclusive, but the asymmetry, known as CP violation, could help explain how the newborn universe generated more matter than antimatter. NOvA spokesperson Patricia Vahle of William & Mary comments on the T2K result and NOvA’s measurements of CP violation. When the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, comes online, it will be able to make more precise measurements of neutrinos’ behavior.

From New Scientist, April 15, 2020: Differences between matter and antimatter, called CP violation, have been measured in some particles, called quarks, but the level isn’t nearly enough to explain the observed imbalance between matter and antimatter. The T2K collaboration has observed hints that CP violation in neutrinos may be able to make up the difference. DUNE spokesperson Ed Blucher of the University of Chicago comments on the result.

From Nature, April 15, 2020: In a mirror world, antiparticles should behave in the same way as particles. But it emerges that neutrinos, electrons and their more exotic cousins might not obey this expected pattern. Fermilab scientist Jessica Turner and Durham University scientist Silvia Pascoli provide a commentary on T2K’s recent neutrino result, CP violation, and how other neutrino experiments, including the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, will make more precise measurements of the mysterious neutrino’s behavior.

From The New York Times, April 15, 2020: An international team of 500 physicists from 12 countries, known as the T2K collaboration, reported that they had measured a slight but telling difference between neutrinos and their opposites, antineutrinos. Fermilab Deputy Director Joe Lykken comments on the result and how the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, may be able to make a definitive discovery of CP violation.

Fermilab’s NOvA neutrino experiment records in its giant particle detector the passage of slippery particles called neutrinos and their antimatter counterparts, antineutrinos. Famously elusive, these particles’ interactions are challenging to capture, requiring the steady accumulation of interaction data to be able to pin down their characteristics. With five years’ worth of data, NOvA is adding to scientists’ understanding of neutrinos’ mass and oscillation behavior.