Symmetry features

Three factoid cards, which look similar to playing cards or a baseball card, appear on a background of stars in a night sky (or in outer space) in a cartoon rendering. On each of the cards is a circle adjusted its sunglasses, presumably each a type of neutrino. Underneath these images on the cards are scribbles representing text and a question mark. In the upper left corner, the abbreviations for electron neutrino, a muon neutrino or a tau neutrino appear.

Figuring out which type of neutrino is heaviest, or solving the puzzle of neutrino mass hierarchy, would be a huge leap in our understanding of both neutrinos and the physics that govern our universe. The NoVA experiment or DUNE could help physicists do just that.

A cartoon-style illustration of a gray outdoor staircase with ornate serpents, tongues out, as the bannisters. Green grass in front, red and purple lightning shapes striking down all over the illustration.

Physicists and archaeologists are teaming up to provide research opportunities for Black and Hispanic undergraduates to image an archaeological site in Mexico using muon tomography. Fermilab personnel will help with the project, and Fermilab will also produce the scintillators for use in the muon detector.

What does it take to envision and build a seemingly impossible particle accelerator? The results of these discussions will shape the next 100 years of particle physics research.

A super-precise experiment at Fermilab is carefully analyzing every detail of the muon’s magnetic moment. The Fermilab Muon g-2 collaboration has announced it will present its first result at 10 a.m. CDT on April 7.

Missing visits to the museum? Or in need of some home-school activities? Check out these five do-it-yourself physics demos from Ketevan Akhobadze, an exhibit developer for the Lederman Science Center at Fermilab.

dearlabby

Symmetry writer Sarah Charley answers life and relationship questions through the lens of fundamental physics. Instead of using analogies from elsewhere in life to explain science, she’ll use physics analogies to explore human nature. This time, she tackles unwanted gifts, when to give up on a dream and how friendships might be like Newtonian mechanics.

Later this decade, the Large Hadron Collider will be upgraded to the High-Luminosity LHC. What does “luminosity” mean in particle physics, and why measure it instead of collisions?