PIP-II

The PIP-II team has installed two webcams for documenting the construction of the conventional facilities to house the PIP-II accelerator and related work. Watch the buildings go up in real time, or have fun looking at time-lapse videos of the site development and construction. The webcams are located on the 16th floor of Wilson Hall, looking east, and the Fermilab Main Ring infield, looking west-northwest. Steve Dixon of the PIP-II Project team led the webcam installation effort.  

From Physics World, Sept. 23, 2020: The Proton Improvement Plan-II linear accelerator is an essential upgrade to the accelerator complex at Fermilab. The project is being led by PIP-II Project Director Lia Merminga, who talks to Physics World about this international effort to keep Fermilab at the forefront of particle physics.

The PIP-II project at Fermilab includes the construction of a 215-meter-long particle accelerator that will accelerate particles to 84% of the speed of light. Research institutions in France, India, Italy, Poland, the UK and the United States are building major components of the new machine. The new particle accelerator will enable Fermilab to generate an unprecedented stream of neutrinos — subtle, subatomic particles that could hold the key to understanding the universe’s evolution.

This is PIP-II's very first low-beta 650-MHz cavity, which arrived at Fermilab on May 14. It is a present from the Italian institute INFN and was made by E. Zanon S.p.A. PIP-II, accelerator technology, accelerator, INFN, collaboration Photo: Andrew Penhollow

This is PIP-II’s very first low-beta 650-MHz cavity, which arrived at Fermilab on May 21. It is a present from the Italian institution INFN and was made by E. Zanon.

Fermilab is currently upgrading its accelerator complex to produce the world’s most powerful beam of high-energy neutrinos. To generate these particles, the accelerators will send an intense beam of protons traveling near the speed of light through a maze of particle accelerator components before passing through metallic “windows” and colliding with a stationary target. Researchers are testing the endurance of windows made of a titanium alloy, exposing samples to high-intensity proton beams to see how well the material will perform.