quantum computing

New amplification algorithms expand the utility of quantum computers to handle non-Boolean scenarios, allowing for an extended range of values to characterize individual records, such as the scores assigned to each disk in the output superposition above. Illustration: Prasanth Shyamsundar

To fully realize the potential of quantum computing, scientists must start with the basics: developing step-by-step procedures, or algorithms, for quantum computers to perform simple tasks. A Fermilab scientist has done just that, announcing two new algorithms that build upon existing work in the field to further diversify the types of problems quantum computers can solve.

From Donne e Scienza, Feb. 5, 2021: In this interview, Fermilab scientist Anna Grassellino talks about quantum computing, her career trajectory, and women and girls in STEM.

From Interesting Engineering, Jan. 5, 2021: A recent breakthroughs in transmitting, storing, and manipulating quantum information have convinced some physicists that a simple proof of principle for a quantum network is imminent. In 2017, a number of institutions partnered with Fermilab to begin constructing a quantum network hosted at Fermilab.

From CNN, Dec. 29, 2020: Researchers are trying to harness the counterintuitive behavior of quantum mechanics to build quantum computers, leading eventually to a quantum internet. The effort isn’t just an abstract goal of academics; it has been identified by the U.S. government as an important national initiative. In this opinion piece, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln discusses the recent quantum teleportation milestone at Fermilab and the quantum internet.

From VICE, Dec. 17, 2020: Fermilab and partners have successfully teleported qubits across 22 kilometers of fiber in two testbeds. The breakthrough is a step towards a practical, high-fidelity quantum internet. Fermilab scientist and Quantum Science Program Head Panagiotis Spentzouris is quoted in this article.

When two heavy ions collide inside a particle accelerator, they produce a near-perfect fluid through which an assortment of fundamental particles swim. For scientists to accurately simulate even a tiny drop of this hot and dense subatomic brew with a classical computer, it would take longer than the age of the universe. Scientists show how quantum computing could be a game-changer in our understanding of quantum processes.