quantum computing

From Forbes, October 11, 2021: Fermilab is part of the Chicago Quantum Exchange (CQE), an intellectual hub to promote the research of quantum information technologies and the development of new commercial uses of it. While quantum computing is still in its infancy, the technology is gaining momentum around the world as governments, academic researchers, security innovators and business leaders are coalescing around the potential quantum has to fundamentally change data communication and security.

From La Repubblica (Italy), September 30, 2021: Fermilab has recently started the development of a quantum computer with performances that go well beyond those of currently existing quantum computers. This project is being lead by Fermilab’s Anna Grassellino, who also graduated in Electronic Engineering from the University of Pisa.

From Inspiring Fifty (Italy) Sept. 7, 2021: Fermilab’s Anna Grasselino was named one of Italy’s most inspiring women in the world of technology. She was recognized for her work as Director of the National Quantum Information Science and head of the SQMS division of Fermilab. Read more about all 50 innovators.

From the University of Chicago News, Sept. 2, 2021: The National Science Foundation is funding a new quantum institute at the University of Chicago that will collaborate with other Chicago-based quantum research and industry partners like Fermilab. The new institute will aim to harness the sensitivities of quantum systems and use those to advance quantum studies in biology.

Photo of a side of a concrete building, tight around a blue door. On the door, one sign that says "Do Not Enter" and below it, another that says "Entrance."

On July 2, accessing the Industrial Building that hosts quantum computing can leave one perplexed. The door is an entrance and the door is not an entrance.

From Science Magazine, June 17, 2021: Fermilab is part of the research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison which has found evidence that computer errors are correlated across an entire superconducting quantum computing chip — highlighting a problem that must be acknowledged and addressed in the quest for fault-tolerant quantum computers.

New amplification algorithms expand the utility of quantum computers to handle non-Boolean scenarios, allowing for an extended range of values to characterize individual records, such as the scores assigned to each disk in the output superposition above. Illustration: Prasanth Shyamsundar

To fully realize the potential of quantum computing, scientists must start with the basics: developing step-by-step procedures, or algorithms, for quantum computers to perform simple tasks. A Fermilab scientist has done just that, announcing two new algorithms that build upon existing work in the field to further diversify the types of problems quantum computers can solve.