quantum computing

Photo of a side of a concrete building, tight around a blue door. On the door, one sign that says "Do Not Enter" and below it, another that says "Entrance."

On July 2, accessing the Industrial Building that hosts quantum computing can leave one perplexed. The door is an entrance and the door is not an entrance.

From Science Magazine, June 17, 2021: Fermilab is part of the research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison which has found evidence that computer errors are correlated across an entire superconducting quantum computing chip — highlighting a problem that must be acknowledged and addressed in the quest for fault-tolerant quantum computers.

New amplification algorithms expand the utility of quantum computers to handle non-Boolean scenarios, allowing for an extended range of values to characterize individual records, such as the scores assigned to each disk in the output superposition above. Illustration: Prasanth Shyamsundar

To fully realize the potential of quantum computing, scientists must start with the basics: developing step-by-step procedures, or algorithms, for quantum computers to perform simple tasks. A Fermilab scientist has done just that, announcing two new algorithms that build upon existing work in the field to further diversify the types of problems quantum computers can solve.

From Donne e Scienza, Feb. 5, 2021: In this interview, Fermilab scientist Anna Grassellino talks about quantum computing, her career trajectory, and women and girls in STEM.

From Interesting Engineering, Jan. 5, 2021: A recent breakthroughs in transmitting, storing, and manipulating quantum information have convinced some physicists that a simple proof of principle for a quantum network is imminent. In 2017, a number of institutions partnered with Fermilab to begin constructing a quantum network hosted at Fermilab.