DOE

Portrait of a man with dark hair and a short beard and mustache wearing glasses, a brown corduroy jacket, a red and blue plaid shirt. His hands are interlaced on the table in front of him. In the lower left corner, the keyboard of a laptop peeks out. He is in front of a starry background.

What if human analysis, combined with machine learning, could advance the study of the universe? The U.S. Department of Energy awarded Fermilab scientist Brian Nord a $2.5 million Early Career Research Award to explore that possibility. Nord has envisioned a new hybrid data-analysis method to undertake the project. It integrates the strengths of artificial intelligence and interpretations of statistics in ways that could potentially advance the studies of cosmology.

Person in cleanroom outfit working on a string of superconducting cavities

A beam of particles is a very useful tool. It can diagnose a disease, destroy a tumor, improve a chip, clean up dirty drinking water, scan containers for suspicious content and do much more. In this video, Fermilab’s Sam Posen talks about accelerator research at Fermilab, a world leader in particle accelerator science and technology.

A woman looks into a microscope

Quantum information science is a key area of research at the Department of Energy’s national labs. Scientists and engineers are working to develop everything from quantum sensors and computers to the quantum internet. In this video, Silvia Zorzetti talks about research at Fermilab’s SQMS Center.

On the left, Portrait of a woman smiling beside a microscope in front of a purple background. Her right hand sits on a table and is holding a chip. She wears a mustard-colored floral hijab and fuschia top. On the right, Portrait of a man with dark curly hair and a short beard and mustache wearing glasses, a brown corduroy jacket, a red and blue plaid shirt. His hands are interlaced on the table in front of him. In the lower left corner, the keyboard of a laptop peeks out. He is in front of a starry background.

The DOE’s Office of Science has selected two Fermilab scientists to receive the 2021 DOE Early Career Research Award, now in its 12th year. Farah Fahim and Brian Nord have received the prestigious award, which is designed to bolster the nation’s scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early years.