detector

You are looking at a silicon detector at the end of the inflector region of the Muon g-2 experiment. This region is the area in which a specialized magnet bends muons after they exit the Muon Delivery Ring (the former Antiproton Debuncher) and enter the Muon g-2 storage ring, which curves to the left in the picture.

Todd Nebel of the Fermilab Test Beam Facility helps unload the prototype hadronic calorimeter built by the PHENIX collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider as part of the sPHENIX upgrade proposal. The calorimeter, shipped from Brookhaven on Jan. 21 and to be used in the T-1044 test experiment, is a five-ton steel-scintillator calorimeter that is read out using silicon photomultipliers. The sPHENIX experiment is designed to measure jet energy loss in heavy-ion collisions to characterize the quark gluon plasma near the transition temperature.

Representatives from the industrial firm IHI Inc. in New York visit Fermilab to see the 35-ton prototype cryostat for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. IHI Corporation, parent company of IHI Inc. and based in Japan, designed and supplied the membrane for the cryostat and the technical supervision during the installation. Fermilab technicians built the cryostat.

This model of the Mu2e solenoids was made on a 3-D printer at the University of Virginia. The Mu2e solenoids will form a continuous magnetic channel that captures pions from a production target, form a secondary muon beam and provide a constant field for momentum analysis of 100-MeV electrons. The magnetic field varies from nearly 5 Tesla (at the far right) to 1 Tesla (at the far left). The Mu2e tracker and calorimeter reside inside the solenoid at the far left. 3-D printing technology makes it possible to fabricate detailed models for a fraction of the cost of a traditional scale model.