DUNE

From The Bogota Post, Feb. 14, 2019: Building change stems from building new role models to get women out of unpaid labor roles and into the country’s laboratories and management boards. Role models include on of the scientists on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment.

From FAPESP, Feb. 13, 2019: Uma parte vital de um dos maiores experimentos da física de partículas atual foi desenvolvida no Brasil. O Arapuca é um detector de luz a ser instalado no Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment — projeto que busca descobrir novas propriedades dos neutrinos, partícula elementar com muito pouca massa e que viaja a uma velocidade muito próxima à da luz.

From University of Missouri – Kansas City’s University News, Feb. 6, 2019: Sánchez, a scientist at Iowa State University, is a part of Fermilab’s NOvA neutrino experiment and the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. She also co-leads the ANNIE experiment at Fermilab.

Physicists often find thrifty, ingenious ways to reuse equipment and resources. What do you do about an 800-ton magnet originally used to discover new particles? Send it off on a months-long journey via truck, train and ship halfway across the world to detect oscillating particles called neutrinos, of course. It’s all part of the vast recycling network of the physics community.

For several weeks, a prototype detector for the Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment collected data using beams from CERN’s particle accelerators. The results show a mature technology exceeding all expectations. It’s the culmination of three years of hard work by a global team dedicated to constructing and bringing the new detector online.

Big discoveries need big detectors, and Fermilab’s DUNE experiment is one of the biggest. In this 10-minute video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln gives the lowdown on this fascinating project. Fermilab plans to shoot beams of neutrinos and antineutrinos through Earth’s crust from Chicago to western South Dakota. DUNE will study neutrino interactions in great detail, with special attention on (a) comparing the behaviors of neutrinos versus antineutrinos, (b) looking for proton decay, and (c) searching for the neutrinos emitted by supernovae. The experiment is being built and should start operations in the mid to late 2020s.

This is a visual display of an ArgoNeuT event showing a long trail left behind by a high energy particle traveling through the liquid argon accompanied by small blips caused by low energy particles.

For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that low-energy neutrinos can be thoroughly identified with a liquid-argon particle detector. The results, obtained with the ArgoNeuT experiment, are promising for experiments that use liquid argon to catch neutrinos, including the upcoming Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment.

Fermilab has finalized an agreement with construction firm Kiewit-Alberici Joint Venture to start pre-excavation work for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, which will house the enormous particle detectors for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. The South Dakota portion of the facility will be built a mile beneath the surface at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.