DUNE

From Crain’s Chicago Business, Feb. 14, 2018: The U.S. House took a big step toward the next generation of research at Fermilab, authorizing a $1.8 billion project that would shoot subatomic particles from Fermilab’s facility to South Dakota.

The ProtoDUNE detector is being assembled at the European laboratory CERN. Photo: Maximilien Brice, CERN

The ProtoDUNE detectors for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment are behemoths in their own right.

One of the ProtoDUNE experiment’s detectors is a single-phase neutrino detector. It will require a number of anode planes to detect the signature of a neutrino interaction in a bath of liquid argon. The University of Wisconsin is fabricating some of these anode planes. This is a glimpse at the process.

From the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council, Jan. 16, 2018: A UK team has just completed their first prototype anode plane assembly, the largest component of the DUNE detector, to be used in the ProtoDUNE detector at CERN.

From Rapid City Journal, Nov. 29, 2017: For more than five years, Ross Shaft crews have been stripping out old steel and lacing, cleaning out decades of debris, adding new ground support and installing new steel to prepare the shaft for its future role in world-leading science. On Oct. 12, all that hard work paid off when the team, which worked its way down from the surface, reached a major milestone: the 4850 Level. Deputy Director Chris Mossey weighs in.

The neutrino puzzle

From Scientific American, Sept. 19, 2017: Fermilab Director Nigel Lockyer, Deputy Director Joe Lykken, DUNE co-spokesperson Mark Thomson, theorist Stephen Parke and Northwestern University’s André de Gouvêa help explain how DUNE, the largest experiment ever to probe mysterious neutrinos, could point the way to new physics.