gravitational waves

From Brazil Culture, November 3, 2021: Fermilab’s Marcelle Soares Santos was included in this impressive exhibit of “Women in Science” curated by the Catavento Museum of São Paulo. The exhibition was conceived to bring to light women who acted and act in a significant way for scientific research and development, presenting, in monumental panels, 12 scientists from different times, nationalities and areas of knowledge. To read in English, click on the title above, right click and hit translate.

From MIT Technology Review, Oct. 21, 2019: We’ve seen ripples in space-time only when the universe’s biggest events occur. Now there might be a way to spot them ahead of time. MAGIS-100 is a project designed to see whether shooting frozen atoms with lasers can be used to observe ultrasensitive signals that might be stretching through space-time. If successful, it could help usher in a new era of “atom interferometry” that could reveal some of the secrets of gravitational waves, dark matter, quantum mechanics, and other heady topics.

Scientists think that, under some circumstances, dark matter could generate powerful enough gravitational waves for equipment like LIGO to detect. Now that observatories have begun to record gravitational waves on a regular basis, scientists are discussing how dark matter—only known so far to interact with other matter only through gravity—might create these gravitational waves.

The discovery of gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein in 1916, is now enabling important tests of the theory of general relativity, as well as beginning multimessenger astronomy: the combined observations of astrophysical phenomena using electromagnetic radiation, gravitational waves and neutrinos. Barish will explore plans and prospects for gravitational-wave science.

This image of the Crab Nebula was taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

For more than a thousand years, alchemists tried to make gold from other metals. Interestingly, science has just explained how gold was made. The explanation is more amazing than anything the alchemists dreamed.

From WTTW’s Chicago Tonight, Oct. 17, 2017: Fermilab’s James Annis is among the panel of scientists who discuss the LIGO/Virgo’s detection of gravitational waves from colliding neutron stars and the optical followup.