gravitational waves

Scientists think that, under some circumstances, dark matter could generate powerful enough gravitational waves for equipment like LIGO to detect. Now that observatories have begun to record gravitational waves on a regular basis, scientists are discussing how dark matter—only known so far to interact with other matter only through gravity—might create these gravitational waves.

The discovery of gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein in 1916, is now enabling important tests of the theory of general relativity, as well as beginning multimessenger astronomy: the combined observations of astrophysical phenomena using electromagnetic radiation, gravitational waves and neutrinos. Barish will explore plans and prospects for gravitational-wave science.

This image of the Crab Nebula was taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

For more than a thousand years, alchemists tried to make gold from other metals. Interestingly, science has just explained how gold was made. The explanation is more amazing than anything the alchemists dreamed.

From WTTW’s Chicago Tonight, Oct. 17, 2017: Fermilab’s James Annis is among the panel of scientists who discuss the LIGO/Virgo’s detection of gravitational waves from colliding neutron stars and the optical followup.

From The New York Times, Oct. 16, 2017: This is the first time LIGO has discovered anything that regular astronomers could see and study. One of the group of astronomers who spotted the speck of light was led by Marcelle Soares-Santos of Brandeis University and using the Dark Energy Camera.