astrophysics

Photo of a dome-shaped building, likely an observatory, atop a mountain, which gold mist surrounds. Blue sky and silhouette of birds above.

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, travel bans and stay-at-home orders meant astrophysicists collaborating on the Dark Energy Survey needed to find a new way to conduct their observations using the Dark Energy Camera.

A man with short gray hair and glasses smiles. He is wearing a black blazer and a black T-shirt that reads "Physics is everything." He is in front of a starry sky. To his right, text that says "Can we find dark matter?" In the lower right-hand corner, an illustration of an atom.

Dark matter remains one of the unsolved mysteries of modern physics. In this video, Fermilab’s Don Lincoln explains two innovative methods whereby Fermilab scientists look for types of dark matter the broader community largely overlooks.

An illustration of a blue magnifying glass with a pie chart of science-themed photo snippets and illustration snippets in its lens. At the center of that pie, reads "Snowmass Survey Initiative 2021." Below the magnifying glass is a yellow graph line and various blue bars as in a bar graph.

The Snowmass early career survey is an initiative to seek input from junior and senior current and former users and collaborators of US-funded experiments and facilities of the High-Energy Physics and Astrophysics community.

A photo of a woman with long, bright-orange hair, wearing sunglasses on top of her head and a light green T-shirt, smiling. Behind her, greenery.

Whether in Serbia or Chicago, Fermilab postdoctoral researcher Aleksandra Ćiprijanović is working to unlock the secrets of the night sky. As a member of the Deep Skies Lab, an international collaboration of physicists, she’s figuring out how to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to better handle the huge amounts of data needed for discovery science.

As the expanding universe cooled after the Big Bang, protons and electrons found each other and made hydrogen atoms, with a little helium and lithium. Illustration: CERN

The existence of hydrogen in our universe was touch-and-go. During the Big Bang, it depended on a minuscule mass difference between two subatomic particles called quarks.

Let’s talk about some of the largest explosions in the universe: supernovae. Join Fermilab scientists Dr. Kirsty Duffy and Dr. Anne Schukraft to find out more about exploding stars, tiny particles and the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS).