cosmology

From Big Think, Nov. 2, 2022: Don Lincoln explores Hubble tension, two very precise yet conflicting estimates of the rate at which the Universe is expanding. While the of Universe expansion is consistent, the two ways in which this is measured begs the question if something is missing in cosmology theory.

The cosmic microwave background has been a treasure trove of information about the universe, as well as a source of questions that have not yet been resolved. In this video, Don Lincoln describes two unsolved mysteries of the CMB. The first makes you ask if the solar system has a special place in the universe, and the second is a giant cold spot that could be the signature of a giant void or, much more unlikely, of colliding universes.

The cosmic microwave background is the fossil remnant of the fireball of the Big Bang. Aside from demonstrating that the Big Bang happened, it can tell us how big the universe is and how much dark matter and energy the universe contains. In this video, Fermilab’s Don Lincoln guides you through this interesting topic.

We have the good fortune of living in a universe with tacos. But why does the universe have tasty treats, people, stars and all sorts of matter, instead of nothing at all? In this episode of Even Bananas, Fermilab’s Kirsty Duffy and neutrino theorist Pedro Machado explain how understanding neutrinos is crucial to understanding our universe’s evolution. Grab your lunch, and let’s talk about breaking fundamental symmetries.

The Cosmic Microwave Background, or CMB, is the remnant of the primordial fireball of the Big Bang. In this video, Fermilab’s Don Lincoln explains how it came to be. This is the first of a three-part series, with following videos to describe what secrets the CMB has revealed and what mysteries remain to be solved.

People who encounter the theory of the Big Bang for the first time often ask, “So where did it happen?” In this video, Don Lincoln tells us the answer – everywhere.

Portrait of a man with dark hair and a short beard and mustache wearing glasses, a brown corduroy jacket, a red and blue plaid shirt. His hands are interlaced on the table in front of him. In the lower left corner, the keyboard of a laptop peeks out. He is in front of a starry background.

What if human analysis, combined with machine learning, could advance the study of the universe? The U.S. Department of Energy awarded Fermilab scientist Brian Nord a $2.5 million Early Career Research Award to explore that possibility. Nord has envisioned a new hybrid data-analysis method to undertake the project. It integrates the strengths of artificial intelligence and interpretations of statistics in ways that could potentially advance the studies of cosmology.