theory

From Inside HPC, Oct. 14, 2020: With the arrival of exascale computing in 2021, researchers expect to have the power to describe the underlying properties of matter and optimize and control the design of new materials and energy technologies at levels that otherwise would have been impossible. Fermilab scientist Andreas Kronfeld talks about how participation in DOE’s Exascale Computing Project can help solve complicated calculations in particle physics.

From Quanta Magazine, October 2020: This 17-minute podcast episode explores how three physicists stumbled across an unexpected relationship between some of the most ubiquitous objects in math. Hear Fermilab scientist Stephen Parke, DUNE collaborator Deborah Harris of York University, and Fields medalist Terence Tao discuss neutrinos, linear algebra, and the international, Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment.

Albert Einstein spent the last decades of his life trying to work out a theory that would explain all known phenomena. He failed, but his vision has been pursued by generations of researchers, and there have been many popular science books and articles that imply that such a theory could be right around the corner. In this talk, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explains the current status in this timeless quest and give the audience a sense of the prospects for completing Einstein’s dream.

From Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sept. 17, 2020: Brookhaven theorists publish an improved prediction for the tiny difference in kaon decays observed by experiments. Understanding these decays and comparing the prediction with more recent state-of-the-art experimental measurements made at Fermilab and CERN gives scientists a way to test for tiny differences between matter and antimatter.

An international team of theoretical physicists have published their calculation of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Their work expands on a simple yet richly descriptive equation that revolutionized physics almost a century ago and that may aid scientists in the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model. Now the world awaits the result from the Fermilab Muon g-2 experiment.

From The Atlantic, Nov. 17, 2019: Describing neutrino oscillations is notoriously tricky. The search for a shortcut by Fermilab physicist Stephen Parke, University of Chicago physicist Xining Zhang and Brookhaven National Laboratory physicist Peter Denton led to unexpected places. They ended up discovering an unexpected relationship between some of the most ubiquitous objects in math.