gravity

Among the most interesting astronomical bodies is the black hole; but it’s also one of the most misunderstood. In this video, Don Lincoln debunks some common misconceptions about black holes and also explains some important truths.

Don Lincoln video: Is antigravity real

Despite featuring in sci-fi and many UFO reports, Antigravity is an idea that is potentially scientifically reputable, and scientists at CERN are investigating possible connections between antimatter and antigravity. Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln covers both the fact and fiction of this interesting topic.

From Super Interessante, Jan. 31, 2021: A team of researchers from Fermilab and the National Observatory in Brazil used the light of solitary stars to calculate the mass of some of the largest structures in the cosmos — galaxy clusters. In addition to taking the most detailed measurement ever published of intracluster light, the team’s new method of measurement can help further investigate dark matter.

From University of Birmingham, Jan. 13, 2021: Fermilab will take part in an international collaboration, led by Cardiff University, on quantum-enhanced interferometry for new physics. The project’s four table-top experiments may help explore new parameter spaces of photon-dark matter interaction, and seek answers to the long-standing question at the heart of modern science: How can gravity be united with the other fundamental forces?

From University of Strathclyde-Glasgow, Jan. 13, 2021: Fermilab will take part in an international collaboration, led by Cardiff University, on quantum-enhanced interferometry for new physics. The project’s four table-top experiments may help explore new parameter spaces of photon-dark matter interaction, and seek answers to the long-standing question at the heart of modern science: How can gravity be united with the other fundamental forces?

From University of Glasgow, Jan. 13, 2021: Fermilab will take part in an international collaboration, led by Cardiff University, on quantum-enhanced interferometry for new physics. The project’s four table-top experiments may help explore new parameter spaces of photon-dark matter interaction, and seek answers to the long-standing question at the heart of modern science: How can gravity be united with the other fundamental forces?

Of the four known forces, one of them stands out as different. Gravity is much weaker than the other known forces, and nobody knows why. In this video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes one possible explanation for the weakness of gravity — the existence of extra dimensions of space.