art

Dark Matters

This work, "Dark Matters," is a concept/sculpture by Jim Jenkins, 2017 Fermilab artist-in-residence. The center of the sculpture is a lead-glass block from the electromagnetic calorimeter of Fermilab experiment E-760/E-835 (charmonium spectroscopy). This picture was taken after a performance of "Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps" by Olivier Messiaen in Ramsey Auditorium. The sculpture was positioned behind the performers on the auditorium stage. Photo: Giulio Stancari

This work, “Dark Matters,” is a concept/sculpture by Jim Jenkins, 2017 Fermilab artist-in-residence. The center of the sculpture is a lead-glass block from the electromagnetic calorimeter of Fermilab experiment E-760/E-835 (charmonium spectroscopy). This picture was taken after a performance of “Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps” by Olivier Messiaen in Ramsey Auditorium. The sculpture was positioned behind the performers on the auditorium stage.

From WDCB’s First Light, Jan. 21, 2018: Fermilab’s 2017 artist-in-residence Jim Jenkins discusses a number of his pieces, now on display in the Fermilab Art Gallery, including his snowflake detector. Director Nigel Lockyer and Curator Georgia Schwender talk about the importance of art to understanding science.

A year ago sculptor Jim Jenkins was announced as Fermilab’s artist-in-residence for 2017. His solo show, titled “A Perplexity of Conundrums,” will be open to the public on Monday, Jan. 8, then on Friday, Jan. 12 from 5-7 p.m.a free public artist’s reception. The show will run through March 2. Jenkins will also collaborate show called “Dark Matters” on Sunday, Jan. 21 at 2:30 p.m., combining his work with a performance of Olivier Messiaen’s “Quartet for the End of Time.”… More »

people, A common assembly area while visiting Fermilab is in front of a piece of artwork depicting a Feynman diagram (on the ground floor of Wilson Hall, west side). It would make a good place for a selfie or photo op as the Fermilab docents speak about Richard Feynman. From Wikipedia: "In theoretical physics, Feynman diagrams are pictorial representations of the mathematical expressions describing the behavior of subatomic particles. The scheme is named for its inventor, American physicist Richard Feynman, and was first introduced in 1948. The interaction of subatomic particles can be complex and difficult to understand intuitively." Photo: Albert Dyer

A common assembly area while visiting Fermilab is in front of a piece of artwork depicting a Feynman diagram (on the ground floor of Wilson Hall, west side). It would make a good place for a selfie or photo op as the Fermilab docents speak about Richard Feynman.

In the Art Gallery on Friday October 20 from 5-8pm meet the artists Candace Wark and Shirley Nannini. In addition see the demonstration of the Wind Tunnel. All are welcome.