art

Visualizing dark matter is not an easy task. Although scientists have reason to believe the mysterious substance makes up about 27% of all the matter and energy in the universe, they still have yet to see it directly; they know it exists only because of its gravitational pull on the visible matter around it. An art exhibit at the Science Gallery Dublin combines art and science to illuminate the invisible nature of dark matter.

From Chicago Gallery News, Sept. 15, 2020: The exhibit “Unexpected: Lisa Goesling & Deanna Krueger” starts at the Fermilab Art Gallery on Sept. 16. While Goesling and Krueger use different materials, they both approach their art with a sense of wonder. What evolves is an energy that is not only seen but also felt.

Currently on display in the Fermilab Art Galley is astrophotography by Marty Murphy and Eric Coles. arts, art Photo: Georgia Schwender

Currently on display in the Fermilab Art Gallery is astrophotography by Marty Murphy and Eric Coles.

Third-grader Maria Esperanza Castro Torres of San Cristóbal, Venezuela, drew this picture of a neutrino interaction in the NOvA detector as part of a school project, working with NOvA scientist Mayly Sanchez of Iowa State University. NOvA, neutrino, art Image: María Esperanza Castro Torres

Third-grader María Esperanza Castro Torres of San Cristóbal, Venezuela, drew this picture of a neutrino interaction in the NOvA detector as part of a school project, working with NOvA scientist Mayly Sanchez of Iowa State University.

A recent coyote Photo of the Day triggered the artist's memory another photo, published in the former Fermilab Today in 2007, by Greg Vogel. It inspired this quick sketch way back then. Hey kids, get out your colored pencils! art, wildlife, animal, mammal, coyote Drawing: Michael Tartaglia

A recent coyote Photo of the Day triggered the artist’s memory another photo, published in the former Fermilab Today in 2007, by Greg Vogel. It inspired this quick sketch way back then. Hey kids, get out your colored pencils!