art

From Medium.com, July 21, 2022: An interview with Fermilab’s artist-in-residence, Mare Hirsch on her creative journey studying music and work in computational fabrication while collaborating with scientists to create data-driven art. Hirsch is now working with Muon g-2 scientists to visually represent aspects of particle physics such as muon precessions and virtual particles.

Get inspired, create a work of art, and submit it online. Your creativity may appear in the Fermilab Virtual Art Gallery! Submissions can include drawing, sculpture, painting or any other type of art. Submission is free, and all ages are welcome. Limit is two pieces per individual. Submit your artwork here through Wednesday, Jan. 26. For more information, visit the webpage on this exciting global project! Last year’s event was a great success. There were entries from 11 states and 10 countries! Check…

From Fraction magazine, September 2021: Former Fermilab artist-in-residence Adam Nadel featured striking photos of an electron beam from a particle accelerator. In a recent issue of this magazine, he used a stream of subatomic electron particles interacting with the silver halide salt found in color photographic paper. The beam was generated on a LINAC electron particle accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory when Nadel was the resident artist in 2018.

From the Illinois Science Council, Aug. 9, 2021: Fermilab’s first artist-in-residence, Lindsay Olson, describes her first days working at Fermilab where her work took her into the tunnels and research areas of the lab to make art out of science.

From Noooz Hawk News (Santa Barbara, CA), August 1, 2021: Who knew data could be so beautiful? Fermilab’s 2021-22 artist-in-residence Mark Hirsch is working with scientists to gain inspiration on the mysteries of matter, energy, space and time.
Georgia Schwender, Fermilab’s art gallery curator said Hirsch is exploring ways that coding and art can combine to convey complex topics like science and math.